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Ireland Golf Vacation Trips Irish Golf Tours

Ireland Sightseeing

< Ennis #1

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A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs.

< Lahinch #1

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A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs.

< The Cliffs of Moher

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A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs, the Aran Islands and mountains as far apart as Kerry and Connemara.

< Ross Castle

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built in the 15th century on the shore of Killarney´s Lower lake by O´ Donoghue Mór. In 1652 Ross fell to the English General General Ludlow. The castle was used as a military barracks in the 18th and 19th centuries. Recently the building has been restored and now open to the public.

< Adare - Overview

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century

< Adare Village

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century.

< Adare Village

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century.

< Ardfert Cathedral

Situated 8 km (5 miles) north west of Tralee on the Ballyheigue Road. It owes its origin to Saint Brendan, who founded a monastry there in the 6th Century. Extensive ruins of the ancient Cathedral and Abbey bear ample testimony to its past.

< Banna Strand

for the spectacular view over Tralee Bay, and its association with Sir Roger Casement, to whom there's a monument. In April 1916, on the eve of the Easter Rising, Casement was captured by local police as he attempted to land at Banna Strand from a German submarine. He was tried and executed for high treason in 1916, and his body was returned from England to Ireland in 1965 to be reinterred with full military honours . You can carry on round the cliffs of Kerry Head for more great vistas - south over Tralee Bay, north across the mouth of the Shannon.

< Blarney Castle

A historic and nostalgic place steeped in history and the ancestral seat of the McCarthy Clan. Nobody is quite certain how the Elizabethan comment developed into the legend that the gift of eloquence may be derived from kissing the Blarney Stone, but it is likely that the stone itself had some significance in the McCarthy Clan. The Kissing Stone itself is set in the battlements and to kiss it the visitor must lie on the walk within the walls, grasp a guard rail, lean back and touch the stone with their lips. It sounds dangerous but it isn't and nobody should leave Blarney without kissing the stone! Also, an opportunity to visit the famous Blarney Woollen Mills for excellent shoppng.

< Blarney Castle

A historic and nostalgic place steeped in history and the ancestral seat of the McCarthy Clan. Nobody is quite certain how the Elizabethan comment developed into the legend that the gift of eloquence may be derived from kissing the Blarney Stone, but it is likely that the stone itself had some significance in the McCarthy Clan. The Kissing Stone itself is set in the battlements and to kiss it the visitor must lie on the walk within the walls, grasp a guard rail, lean back and touch the stone with their lips. It sounds dangerous but it isn't and nobody should leave Blarney without kissing the stone! Also, an opportunity to visit the famous Blarney Woollen Mills for excellent shoppng.

< Boyce Gardens

This award winning garden, one acre in size, overlooks the River Shannon. Designed for year round colour, it is divided into a number of intimate garden rooms inter-linked by curved paths. There is a large collection of New Zealand, Australian and South African plants. It contains rockeries, herbaceous borders, sunken garden, water garden and fountain, rose garden, vegetable garden, glasshouse and conservatory.

< Brewery Tour

The Kinsale Brewing Company occupies beautifully restored malthouses dating from 1703 in the heart of Kinsale, and reviving a tradition going back 200 years. The brewery offers a guided tour taking you through each step of the brewing process. At the end of the tour you can browse through the gift shop and sample some of the beers produced, or you can just walk in and soak in the atmosphere of the old brewery bar upstairs.

< Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.

< Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.

< Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.

< Charles Fort

The vast star shaped Charles Fort, which was built in 1677, is only a short distance from the town. William Robinson, the original architect, also built the Royal Hospital at Kilmainham in Dublin. Charles Fort has undergone many changes in the last few centuries and it continued to be garrisoned until 1922. It is open to the public from mid-April to mid-October and guided tours are available.

< Cobh Heritage Centre

The story of Cobh's origins, it's unque history and legacy are dramatically recalled at The Queenstown Story - a stunning multi media exhibition at Cobh's restored Victorian Railway Station. Themes include The Titanic (Cobh was her last port of call), Emigration & Famine. From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration.

< Connor Pass

The Connor Pass road is undoubtedly the most dramatic route to take. As it swings towards the south it rises at the side of a large valley formed by glaciers that came from a semi-circle of coums or corries in the surrounding mountains. From the top of the pass there are breathtaking views in fine weather of lowlands, mountains and sea. High vantage points provide the best position from which to take in the sweep of the landscape.

< Corcomroe Abbey

sited a few miles from Ballyvaughan within sight of the coast. The abbey is sited in a valley and was founded between 1182 and 1195. Most of the buildings have vanished with the exception of the church and various surrounding walls. The chancel area (around the altar) has some of the finest stone carving in Ireland. Founded by the O’Briens, Kings of Thomond, it was much more sensible to endow a monastery and claim it was God’s land than build a castle which was certain to be beseiged continually.

< Corcomroe Abbey

sited a few miles from Ballyvaughan within sight of the coast. The abbey is sited in a valley and was founded between 1182 and 1195. Most of the buildings have vanished with the exception of the church and various surrounding walls. The chancel area (around the altar) has some of the finest stone carving in Ireland. Founded by the O’Briens, Kings of Thomond, it was much more sensible to endow a monastery and claim it was God’s land than build a castle which was certain to be beseiged continually.

< Cork - Overview

Cork City is the third largest city in Ireland and has always been an important seaport. It began on an island in the swampy estuary of the River Lee (the Irish for Cork 'Corcaigh' means a marsh) and gradually climbed up the steep banks on either side. Today the river flows through the city in two main channels so you find yourself constantly crossing bridges. The city owes its origins to St. Finbarr who in the 6th century founded a monastery on the south bank of the River Lee where St. Finn Barre's Cathedral stands today. Today Cork blends its history and culture with the amenities of a cosmopolitan city and was the European City of Culture in 2005.

< Cork #1

Visit the wonderful harbour village of Kinsale. Known as the gourmet capital of Ireland and one of the countries’s most attractive villages with narrow lanes and slate hung houses overlooking the broad estuary of the River Bandon. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine and the many interesting speciality shops.

< Cork #2

No visit to Ireland would be complete without the opportunity to “Kiss the Blarney Stone”. Located in Blarney Castle to the north of Cork. The gift of eloquent speech is said to be bestowed on all those who kiss the Stone. The adjacent Blarney Woollen Mills allows the visitor to watch the weaving process and make purchases.

< Desmond Castle International Museum of Wine

Kinsale's International Museum of Wine tells the romantic story of the Irish emigrants who colonised the wine trade throughout the world after being forced to leave their own shores. The museum is located in Desmond Castle, a 15th century Customs House which belonged to the Fitzgerald family. Kinsale was a designated Wine Port and supplied ships for the Vintage Fleet (forerunner of the British Navy) as far back as 1412. In the 17th century Desmond Castle was turned into a prison - its inmates were mainly French and captured at sea so the castle was populartly known as the "French prison". Conditions were grim with overcrowding, lack of food, cold and disease. In 1747 there was a disasterous fire in the prison in which fifty four prisoners perished.

< Dingle Peninsula

The Dingle Peninsula is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland. The combination of rugged mountains, craggy cliffs and long sandy beaches brought David Lean here to film 'Ryan's Daughter' in 1970. More recently, the Tom Cruise film 'Far and Away' was made in the Slea Head area. Dingle town is also an important commercial fishing port, built around an enclosed harbour and has many fine restaurants and craft shops.

< Doonbeg

Take a trip around the Loop Head Peninsula. The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.

< Ennis - Overview

Ennis is the principal town in Co Clare, a busy market centre on the River Fergus. Its famous narrow streets are dotted with a host of unusual shops, bars and restaurants. Ennis is regarded as the heartland of Irish music, look out for superb nightly sessions, as well as some very lively annual festivals. Ennis is an ideal centre for touring around Co Clare. Whether you'd like to banquet at 15th century Bunratty Castle, visit the delightful lakes of East Clare or explore the isolated loop head coastline, everything is a short drive from Ennis.

< Ennis #2

Take time to explore the northwestern corner of Co Clare, bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the quieter waters of Galway Bay, is a rock landscape of no ordinary proportions. The area known as the Burren Country extends over one hundred square miles and consists of pale grey limestone. Countless wild flowers and historic monuments make the Burren a unique and worthwhile visit.

< Foynes Flying Boat Museum

From 1939 to 1945 Foynes, was the centre of the aviation world, for air traffic between the United States and Europe. The Foynes Museum recalls this era with a comprehensive range of exhibits and graphic illustrations. The museum features the original Terminal Building, Radio and Weather Room (complete with transmitters, receivers and Morse code equipment). The exhibits feature an introduction to the first transatlantic passenger service and Foynes during the war years. Irish Coffee was invented in Foynes. Chef Joe Sheridan made the first in 1942 to warm up some damp and miserable passengers. Since then Irish Coffee has become one the most popular welcoming drinks in the world.

< Gap of Dunloe

For over 200 years visitors to Killarney have been taking ´The Gap Tour´. Without doubt it is a ´classic´ in every sense. Travel by coach to Kate Kearney´s Cottage and change there to jaunting car or pony for the journey through the Gap of Dunloe, a magnificent glaciated valley with high cliffs and isolated lakes.

< Killarney - Overview

Located in the South West of Ireland in the County of Kerry - Ireland's premier visitor destination. Killarney offers so much to visitors with plenty to see and do all year round. It sprang into prominence when 18th century tourists were drawn to its wonderful setting under the shadow of Ireland’s highest mountains and beside its scenic lakes. Killarney is also the starting point of the drive around the Iveragh peninsula, a dramatically scenic route, commonly known as the Ring of Kerry. The complete route is 100 miles long but your journey will be broken by many stops to admire the scenic beauty of the area that changes dramatically around every corner.

< Killarney #1

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Take time to explore Killarney and the surrounding area. The town is set amidst the most beautiful lake and mountain scenery. Visit Ross Castle on the edge of Lough Leanne or Muckross House surrounded by wonderful gardens and the Muckross Lake. Take a trip to Kate Kearney’s Cottage and the start of the breathtaking Gap of Dunloe.

< Killarney #2

Drive around the Iveragh peninsula, a dramatically scenic route, commonly known as the Ring of Kerry. The complete route is 100 miles long but your journey will be broken by many stops to admire the scenic beauty of the area that changes dramatically around every corner. Watch how the landscape changes from the “Peat Bogs” to dramatic cliff tops view over the Atlantic Ocean.

< Killmallock

Around the walled town which was one of the principal towns of the province of Munster in medieval times, are the earliest known roots of man in the south-west of Ireland. Excavations at Tankardstown uncovered a complex of houses and early farming activity dating from shortly after 4000 B.C. Scale models of the Stone Age houses and a large model of the medieval town are featured in Kilmallock Museum. Substantial portions of the old town walls survive as well as town gates – Blossom Gate and John’s Gate a landmark in the centre of the town. Church and abbey ruins testify to the importance of the area from the 13th to 15th centuries.

< Kinsale

One of Ireland’s most attractive villages. Visitors are captivated by the town's setting, its long waterfront, narrow streets and slate-clad houses. The bulk of Compass Hill rises sharply over the town, overlooking a natural harbour of great beauty where the Bandon river turns south to the sea. Known as the gourmet captial of Ireland this harbour town has many fine restaurants who pride themselves on their high reputation for culinary expertise. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine, Charles Fort, the Kinsale Brewing Company and the many interesting speciality shops.

< Kinsale - Overview

One of Ireland’s most attractive villages. Visitors are captivated by the town's setting, its long waterfront, narrow streets and slate-clad houses. The bulk of Compass Hill rises sharply over the town, overlooking a natural harbour of great beauty where the Bandon river turns south to the sea. Known as the gourmet captial of Ireland this harbour town has many fine restaurants who pride themselves on their high reputation for culinary expertise. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine and the many interesting speciality shops.

< Ladies View

The most famous and photographed view of Killarney is to be seen at Ladies´ View approximately 11 miles from Killarney town, on the N71 to Kenmare. From here there is a marvellous view of the Killarney Valley. A little further on is another parking area offering spectacular views of the Upper Lake and its islands. Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s highest peak, and the McGillycuddy Reeks (mountains) tower over this most memorable scene.

< Lahinch - Overview

Lahinch sits on the Atlantic Ocean and has developed into a friendly holiday centre and golfing mecca. It nestles at the head of Liscannor Bay beside a 2km long beach of golden sands. The old Irish name for Lahinch translates to the “Tomb of O’Connor”, the chieftain of an old local Celtic clan, who according to tradition is buried here. The village is a short drive from the Cliffs of Moher and an ideal location for exploring the Burren Country and taking a drive out to the Loop Head Peninsula. In the holiday season Lahinch is alive with music and dance.

< Lahinch #2

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Visit Bunratty Castle & Folk Park. Illustrating country life in Ireland at the turn of the century, when the old agricultural practices were giving way to the modern era. Your tour should include a visit to the famous "Durty Nellies" reputed to be the oldest pub in Ireland.

< Loop Head Peninsula

The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.

< Loop Head Peninsula

The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.

< Monks Pub in Ballyvaughan

Renowned for its seafood chowder and friendly atmosphere, Monks Pub is frequented by locals and tourists alike. It is located beside the "old pier" on Ballyvaughan harbour. On a nice sunny day there is nothing like have a drink or a meal sitting outside the pub or even sitting on the harbour wall.

< Monks Pub in Ballyvaughan

Renowned for its seafood chowder and friendly atmosphere, Monks Pub is frequented by locals and tourists alike. It is located beside the "old pier" on Ballyvaughan harbour. On a nice sunny day there is nothing like have a drink or a meal sitting outside the pub or even sitting on the harbour wall.

< Muckross House and Gardens

Situated close to the shores of Muckross Lake, amidst the beautiul scenery of Killarney National Park. Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was the designer. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843. Today the principal rooms are furnished in period style and portray the elegant lifestyle of the 19th century landowning class. While in the basement, one can imagine the busy bustle of the servants as they went about their daily chores. The Gardens are spectacularly adorned with the red and pink flowers of mature Rhododendrons. Other garden features include a Sunken Garden, a Rock Garden and a Stream Garden. An Arboretum, containing many trees from the Southern Hemisphere, was established here in 1972.

< Muckross House and Gardens, Killarney

close to the shores of Muckross Lake, amidst the beautiul scenery of Killarney National Park. Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was the designer. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843. Today the principal rooms are furnished in period style and portray the elegant lifestyle of the 19th century landowning class. While in the basement, one can imagine the busy bustle of the servants as they went about their daily chores. The Gardens are spectacularly adorned with the red and pink flowers of mature Rhododendrons. Other garden features include a Sunken Garden, a Rock Garden and a Stream Garden. An Arboretum, containing many trees from the Southern Hemisphere, was established here in 1972.

< Old Midleton Distillery

The visitor is invited to take a one hour tour of the Old Midleton Distillery, the home of Jameson Irish whiskey. The guided tour begins with an audio visual presentation followed by a walk through the beautifully restored industrial complex, unique within Ireland and Britain. See the fully operational Water Wheel, large Grain Stores, Mill Buildings and the largest Pot Still in the world. With the appetite suitably whetted take time to experience the famous tutored Irish Whiskey Tasting in the Jameson Bar.

< Old Midleton Distillery

The visitor is invited to take a one hour tour of the Old Midleton Distillery, the home of Jameson Irish whiskey. The guided tour begins with an audio visual presentation followed by a walk through the beautifully restored industrial complex, unique within Ireland and Britain. See the fully operational Water Wheel, large Grain Stores, Mill Buildings and the largest Pot Still in the world. With the appetite suitably whetted take time to experience the famous tutored Irish Whiskey Tasting in the Jameson Bar.

< Ring of Kerry

Stretching out into the Atlantic Ocean, the Iveragh Peninsula has a backbone of mighty mountains. Every environment is here, from the snow-capped Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s loftiest peak, through woodland and blanket bog, to the sandy beaches of the coast. The warm waters of the Gulf Stream ensure a mild climate all the year round. Sub-tropical plants grow quite happily here - adding marvellous splashes of colour to the countryside. This is the setting for Ireland´s greatest tour, The Ring of Kerry. The 110-mile (176k) circuit takes in Killorglin, Glenbeigh, Caherciveen, Waterville, Sneem, Kenmare, and Killarney. Killorglin, the home of the legendary Puck Fair, straddles the Laune, an excellent salmon-fishing river. The village of Glenbeigh is hugely popular in summer because of the glorious beach at Rossbeigh and the links course at Dooks. At Caherciveen you can visit the birthplace of the great justice-seeker and parliamentarian Daniel O´Connell (1775-1847). The Liberator, as he was known, eventually settled near the beautiful secluded beaches of Derrynane. In this century, Charlie Chaplin of silent screen fame was a regular visitor to Waterville. Sneem, possibly Ireland´s most colourful village, has won national awards for its beauty and neatness. George Bernard Shaw did much of his playwriting while staying at the nearby Parknasilla Hotel. While much of the coach traffic takes the direct route from Sneem to Moll´s Gap, it is worth going the extra miles to visit the town of Kenmare with its delightful shops and excellent restaurants. If you travel the Ring anti-clockwise, as most traffic tends to do, then spectacular views await you as you head from Moll´s Gap down into the Killarney Valley.

< Ring of Kerry

Stretching out into the Atlantic Ocean, the Iveragh Peninsula has a backbone of mighty mountains. Every environment is here, from the snow-capped Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s loftiest peak, through woodland and blanket bog, to the sandy beaches of the coast. The warm waters of the Gulf Stream ensure a mild climate all the year round. Sub-tropical plants grow quite happily here - adding marvellous splashes of colour to the countryside. This is the setting for Ireland´s greatest tour, The Ring of Kerry. The 110-mile (176k) circuit takes in Killorglin, Glenbeigh, Caherciveen, Waterville, Sneem, Kenmare, and Killarney. Killorglin, the home of the legendary Puck Fair, straddles the Laune, an excellent salmon-fishing river. The village of Glenbeigh is hugely popular in summer because of the glorious beach at Rossbeigh and the links course at Dooks. At Caherciveen you can visit the birthplace of the great justice-seeker and parliamentarian Daniel O´Connell (1775-1847). The Liberator, as he was known, eventually settled near the beautiful secluded beaches of Derrynane. In this century, Charlie Chaplin of silent screen fame was a regular visitor to Waterville. Sneem, possibly Ireland´s most colourful village, has won national awards for its beauty and neatness. George Bernard Shaw did much of his playwriting while staying at the nearby Parknasilla Hotel. While much of the coach traffic takes the direct route from Sneem to Moll´s Gap, it is worth going the extra miles to visit the town of Kenmare with its delightful shops and excellent restaurants. If you travel the Ring anti-clockwise, as most traffic tends to do, then spectacular views await you as you head from Moll´s Gap down into the Killarney Valley.

< Shannon #1

Take the opportunity to visit Adare, which is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. It snuggles in a wooded setting among rich quiet farmlands by the River Maigue. Orange thatched cottages line its broad street, punctuated with beautiful old stone buildings and picturesque ruins.

< Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Visit Bunratty Castle & Folk Park. Illustrating country life in Ireland at the turn of the century, when the old agricultural practices were giving way to the modern era. Your tour should include a visit to the famous “Durty Nellies” reputed to be the oldest pub in Ireland.

< St Finn Barre’s Cathedral

Situated on a hill and named after the city's patron saint, this early French Gothic cathedral is one of the finest buildings in the city. It stands where the saint established his monastic school about 650 AD. Among its most striking features are the fine rose window, the mosaic pavements and the elaborate carving throughout. The main doorway has a carving depicting the five wise and five foolish virgins meeting the bridegroom

< St. Multose

Built in 1190, St. Multose still retains many of its original features. The black letter inscriptions in Norman French, the Easter sepulchre, the baptismal font and the reredos from the Galway Chapel are all features of note. Also worth seeing are the town stocks and a wooden coat of arms. Here Charles II was proclaimed as King by Prince Rupert. St. Multose is one of the oldest Church of Ireland churches in the country.

< Stephen Pearce Pottery

located a few hundred yards from the village of Shanagarry and the sleepy fishing village of Ballycotton. Stephen Pearce pottery is all hand made and hand decorated. It continues a 250 year tradition of hand crafted pottery in Co. Cork. In the ancient rural setting of Shanagarry it is easy to appreciate the unique quality of each pot, especially when you see for yourself the person and the hands that created it. Visitors are welcome to watch this ancient craft or to browse through the shop which stocks a selection of Simon Pearce Glass, Jewellery, Linens and of course the entire ranges of Stephen Pearce

< The Burren Country

The name Burren is from the Irish – “bhoireann” meaning a stony place. This area to the north west corner of Clare has lain unspoiled since the ice-age and is composed of karstic limestone, the largest area of such in western Europe. It is a place of surprise and delight to botanists, archaeologists and ecologists alike Here grows a wide variety of the most unusual and rarest of plants. This area has some of the finest archaeological megalithic tombs in Ireland, if not in Western Europe. There are relics of human habitation dating back almost 6000 years and in this area alone there are more than 60 wedge tombs, the densest concentration in Ireland. There are also numerous examples of raths earthen ring forts and stone cashels.

< The Burren Country

The name Burren is from the Irish – “bhoireann” meaning a stony place. This area to the north west corner of Clare has lain unspoiled since the ice-age and is composed of karstic limestone, the largest area of such in western Europe. It is a place of surprise and delight to botanists, archaeologists and ecologists alike Here grows a wide variety of the most unusual and rarest of plants. This area has some of the finest archaeological megalithic tombs in Ireland, if not in Western Europe. There are relics of human habitation dating back almost 6000 years and in this area alone there are more than 60 wedge tombs, the densest concentration in Ireland. There are also numerous examples of raths earthen ring forts and stone cashels.

< The Burren Smokehouse

A family run organisation that was set up in 1989 and since that time they have been producing Ireland’s finest oak smoked Atlantic salmon. The art of cold smoking is historically unique to Ireland. Live demonstrations help the visitor to appreciate the time, skill and care that this truly Irish craft involves. The Smokehouse currently employs a staff of twelve, and ships within Ireland and to countries all over the world.

< The Burren Smokehouse

A family run organisation that was set up in 1989 and since that time they have been producing Ireland’s finest oak smoked Atlantic salmon. The art of cold smoking is historically unique to Ireland. Live demonstrations help the visitor to appreciate the time, skill and care that this truly Irish craft involves. The Smokehouse currently employs a staff of twelve, and ships within Ireland and to countries all over the world.

< The Dingle Peninsula

is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland. The combination of rugged mountains, craggy cliffs and long sandy beaches brought David Lean here to film 'Ryan's Daughter' in 1970. More recently, the Tom Cruise film 'Far and Away' was made in the Slea Head area. Dingle town is also an important commercial fishing port, built around an enclosed harbour and has many fine restaurants and craft shops.

< The Mizen Peninsula & Ballydehob

The Mizen Peninsula is an area of truly rugged beauty. Travelling west along the N71 from Skibbereen to Ballydehob the sea vista is awesome, with the Fastnet Rock Lighthouse to be seen in the distance. Ballydehob's twelve-arch bridge overlooks a water sports lagoon. Here, the N71 takes a right for Bantry, but you can continue straight on through the village to complete the Mizen tour. (Full Day touring).

< The Mizen Peninsula & Ballydehob

The Mizen Peninsula is an area of truly rugged beauty. Travelling west along the N71 from Skibbereen to Ballydehob the sea vista is awesome, with the Fastnet Rock Lighthouse to be seen in the distance. Ballydehob's twelve-arch bridge overlooks a water sports lagoon. Here, the N71 takes a right for Bantry, but you can continue straight on through the village to complete the Mizen tour. (Full Day touring).

< Tralee

Take the opportunity to explore the remote Dingle peninsula. The Peninsula is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland.

< Tralee - Overview

Tralee is the administrative capital of County Kerry. Famed for its Rose of Tralee Festival held every year at the end of August. Tralee is a lovely town with wide streets surrounded by narrow streets giving a pleasant village feeling. It central location makes for an ideal base for touring the scenic beauty of Kerry
Ennis #1 image

A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs.


Lahinch #1 image

A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs.


The Cliffs of Moher image

A visit to the Cliffs of Moher is a must. Just north of Lahinch, they defiantly stand as giant natural ramparts against the aggressive might of the Atlantic Ocean. They rise in places to over 700 feet and stretch for over 5 miles. O’Brien’s Tower is located on the highest point and offers the best view of the Cliffs, the Aran Islands and mountains as far apart as Kerry and Connemara.


Ross Castle image

built in the 15th century on the shore of Killarney´s Lower lake by O´ Donoghue Mór. In 1652 Ross fell to the English General General Ludlow. The castle was used as a military barracks in the 18th and 19th centuries. Recently the building has been restored and now open to the public.


Adare - Overview

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century


Adare Village

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century.


Adare Village

Adare is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. Snuggled in a wooded setting among quiet farmlands of the Golden Vale by the River Maigue. Adare Dates from the time of the Norman Conquest. Thatched cottages lines its broad street, puntuated with beautiful stone buildings and pictureque ruins. The River Maigue flows under a graceful stone bridge while ruined medieval monasteries quietly count the passing centuries. A Heritage Centre in the village traces the development of Adare from the 13th century.


Ardfert Cathedral

Situated 8 km (5 miles) north west of Tralee on the Ballyheigue Road. It owes its origin to Saint Brendan, who founded a monastry there in the 6th Century. Extensive ruins of the ancient Cathedral and Abbey bear ample testimony to its past.


Banna Strand

for the spectacular view over Tralee Bay, and its association with Sir Roger Casement, to whom there's a monument. In April 1916, on the eve of the Easter Rising, Casement was captured by local police as he attempted to land at Banna Strand from a German submarine. He was tried and executed for high treason in 1916, and his body was returned from England to Ireland in 1965 to be reinterred with full military honours . You can carry on round the cliffs of Kerry Head for more great vistas - south over Tralee Bay, north across the mouth of the Shannon.


Blarney Castle

A historic and nostalgic place steeped in history and the ancestral seat of the McCarthy Clan. Nobody is quite certain how the Elizabethan comment developed into the legend that the gift of eloquence may be derived from kissing the Blarney Stone, but it is likely that the stone itself had some significance in the McCarthy Clan. The Kissing Stone itself is set in the battlements and to kiss it the visitor must lie on the walk within the walls, grasp a guard rail, lean back and touch the stone with their lips. It sounds dangerous but it isn't and nobody should leave Blarney without kissing the stone! Also, an opportunity to visit the famous Blarney Woollen Mills for excellent shoppng.


Blarney Castle

A historic and nostalgic place steeped in history and the ancestral seat of the McCarthy Clan. Nobody is quite certain how the Elizabethan comment developed into the legend that the gift of eloquence may be derived from kissing the Blarney Stone, but it is likely that the stone itself had some significance in the McCarthy Clan. The Kissing Stone itself is set in the battlements and to kiss it the visitor must lie on the walk within the walls, grasp a guard rail, lean back and touch the stone with their lips. It sounds dangerous but it isn't and nobody should leave Blarney without kissing the stone! Also, an opportunity to visit the famous Blarney Woollen Mills for excellent shoppng.


Boyce Gardens

This award winning garden, one acre in size, overlooks the River Shannon. Designed for year round colour, it is divided into a number of intimate garden rooms inter-linked by curved paths. There is a large collection of New Zealand, Australian and South African plants. It contains rockeries, herbaceous borders, sunken garden, water garden and fountain, rose garden, vegetable garden, glasshouse and conservatory.


Brewery Tour

The Kinsale Brewing Company occupies beautifully restored malthouses dating from 1703 in the heart of Kinsale, and reviving a tradition going back 200 years. The brewery offers a guided tour taking you through each step of the brewing process. At the end of the tour you can browse through the gift shop and sample some of the beers produced, or you can just walk in and soak in the atmosphere of the old brewery bar upstairs.


Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.


Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.


Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

A restored Norman-Irish keep built in 1277, the castle houses a fine collection of furniture and furnishings from the 14th to 17th centuries. Medieval banquets are a twice nightly feasture throughout the year. The Folk Park, in the castle grounds is a reconstructed 19th century street, with craft shops, general stores and post office. Traditional crafts can be seen in action and country meals are served in the barn restaurant.


Charles Fort

The vast star shaped Charles Fort, which was built in 1677, is only a short distance from the town. William Robinson, the original architect, also built the Royal Hospital at Kilmainham in Dublin. Charles Fort has undergone many changes in the last few centuries and it continued to be garrisoned until 1922. It is open to the public from mid-April to mid-October and guided tours are available.


Cobh Heritage Centre

The story of Cobh's origins, it's unque history and legacy are dramatically recalled at The Queenstown Story - a stunning multi media exhibition at Cobh's restored Victorian Railway Station. Themes include The Titanic (Cobh was her last port of call), Emigration & Famine. From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration.


Connor Pass

The Connor Pass road is undoubtedly the most dramatic route to take. As it swings towards the south it rises at the side of a large valley formed by glaciers that came from a semi-circle of coums or corries in the surrounding mountains. From the top of the pass there are breathtaking views in fine weather of lowlands, mountains and sea. High vantage points provide the best position from which to take in the sweep of the landscape.


Corcomroe Abbey

sited a few miles from Ballyvaughan within sight of the coast. The abbey is sited in a valley and was founded between 1182 and 1195. Most of the buildings have vanished with the exception of the church and various surrounding walls. The chancel area (around the altar) has some of the finest stone carving in Ireland. Founded by the O’Briens, Kings of Thomond, it was much more sensible to endow a monastery and claim it was God’s land than build a castle which was certain to be beseiged continually.


Corcomroe Abbey

sited a few miles from Ballyvaughan within sight of the coast. The abbey is sited in a valley and was founded between 1182 and 1195. Most of the buildings have vanished with the exception of the church and various surrounding walls. The chancel area (around the altar) has some of the finest stone carving in Ireland. Founded by the O’Briens, Kings of Thomond, it was much more sensible to endow a monastery and claim it was God’s land than build a castle which was certain to be beseiged continually.


Cork - Overview

Cork City is the third largest city in Ireland and has always been an important seaport. It began on an island in the swampy estuary of the River Lee (the Irish for Cork 'Corcaigh' means a marsh) and gradually climbed up the steep banks on either side. Today the river flows through the city in two main channels so you find yourself constantly crossing bridges. The city owes its origins to St. Finbarr who in the 6th century founded a monastery on the south bank of the River Lee where St. Finn Barre's Cathedral stands today. Today Cork blends its history and culture with the amenities of a cosmopolitan city and was the European City of Culture in 2005.


Cork #1

Visit the wonderful harbour village of Kinsale. Known as the gourmet capital of Ireland and one of the countries’s most attractive villages with narrow lanes and slate hung houses overlooking the broad estuary of the River Bandon. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine and the many interesting speciality shops.


Cork #2

No visit to Ireland would be complete without the opportunity to “Kiss the Blarney Stone”. Located in Blarney Castle to the north of Cork. The gift of eloquent speech is said to be bestowed on all those who kiss the Stone. The adjacent Blarney Woollen Mills allows the visitor to watch the weaving process and make purchases.


Desmond Castle International Museum of Wine

Kinsale's International Museum of Wine tells the romantic story of the Irish emigrants who colonised the wine trade throughout the world after being forced to leave their own shores. The museum is located in Desmond Castle, a 15th century Customs House which belonged to the Fitzgerald family. Kinsale was a designated Wine Port and supplied ships for the Vintage Fleet (forerunner of the British Navy) as far back as 1412. In the 17th century Desmond Castle was turned into a prison - its inmates were mainly French and captured at sea so the castle was populartly known as the "French prison". Conditions were grim with overcrowding, lack of food, cold and disease. In 1747 there was a disasterous fire in the prison in which fifty four prisoners perished.


Dingle Peninsula

The Dingle Peninsula is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland. The combination of rugged mountains, craggy cliffs and long sandy beaches brought David Lean here to film 'Ryan's Daughter' in 1970. More recently, the Tom Cruise film 'Far and Away' was made in the Slea Head area. Dingle town is also an important commercial fishing port, built around an enclosed harbour and has many fine restaurants and craft shops.


Doonbeg

Take a trip around the Loop Head Peninsula. The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.


Ennis - Overview

Ennis is the principal town in Co Clare, a busy market centre on the River Fergus. Its famous narrow streets are dotted with a host of unusual shops, bars and restaurants. Ennis is regarded as the heartland of Irish music, look out for superb nightly sessions, as well as some very lively annual festivals. Ennis is an ideal centre for touring around Co Clare. Whether you'd like to banquet at 15th century Bunratty Castle, visit the delightful lakes of East Clare or explore the isolated loop head coastline, everything is a short drive from Ennis.


Ennis #2

Take time to explore the northwestern corner of Co Clare, bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the quieter waters of Galway Bay, is a rock landscape of no ordinary proportions. The area known as the Burren Country extends over one hundred square miles and consists of pale grey limestone. Countless wild flowers and historic monuments make the Burren a unique and worthwhile visit.


Foynes Flying Boat Museum

From 1939 to 1945 Foynes, was the centre of the aviation world, for air traffic between the United States and Europe. The Foynes Museum recalls this era with a comprehensive range of exhibits and graphic illustrations. The museum features the original Terminal Building, Radio and Weather Room (complete with transmitters, receivers and Morse code equipment). The exhibits feature an introduction to the first transatlantic passenger service and Foynes during the war years. Irish Coffee was invented in Foynes. Chef Joe Sheridan made the first in 1942 to warm up some damp and miserable passengers. Since then Irish Coffee has become one the most popular welcoming drinks in the world.


Gap of Dunloe

For over 200 years visitors to Killarney have been taking ´The Gap Tour´. Without doubt it is a ´classic´ in every sense. Travel by coach to Kate Kearney´s Cottage and change there to jaunting car or pony for the journey through the Gap of Dunloe, a magnificent glaciated valley with high cliffs and isolated lakes.


Killarney - Overview

Located in the South West of Ireland in the County of Kerry - Ireland's premier visitor destination. Killarney offers so much to visitors with plenty to see and do all year round. It sprang into prominence when 18th century tourists were drawn to its wonderful setting under the shadow of Ireland’s highest mountains and beside its scenic lakes. Killarney is also the starting point of the drive around the Iveragh peninsula, a dramatically scenic route, commonly known as the Ring of Kerry. The complete route is 100 miles long but your journey will be broken by many stops to admire the scenic beauty of the area that changes dramatically around every corner.


Killarney #1 image

Take time to explore Killarney and the surrounding area. The town is set amidst the most beautiful lake and mountain scenery. Visit Ross Castle on the edge of Lough Leanne or Muckross House surrounded by wonderful gardens and the Muckross Lake. Take a trip to Kate Kearney’s Cottage and the start of the breathtaking Gap of Dunloe.


Killarney #2

Drive around the Iveragh peninsula, a dramatically scenic route, commonly known as the Ring of Kerry. The complete route is 100 miles long but your journey will be broken by many stops to admire the scenic beauty of the area that changes dramatically around every corner. Watch how the landscape changes from the “Peat Bogs” to dramatic cliff tops view over the Atlantic Ocean.


Killmallock

Around the walled town which was one of the principal towns of the province of Munster in medieval times, are the earliest known roots of man in the south-west of Ireland. Excavations at Tankardstown uncovered a complex of houses and early farming activity dating from shortly after 4000 B.C. Scale models of the Stone Age houses and a large model of the medieval town are featured in Kilmallock Museum. Substantial portions of the old town walls survive as well as town gates – Blossom Gate and John’s Gate a landmark in the centre of the town. Church and abbey ruins testify to the importance of the area from the 13th to 15th centuries.


Kinsale

One of Ireland’s most attractive villages. Visitors are captivated by the town's setting, its long waterfront, narrow streets and slate-clad houses. The bulk of Compass Hill rises sharply over the town, overlooking a natural harbour of great beauty where the Bandon river turns south to the sea. Known as the gourmet captial of Ireland this harbour town has many fine restaurants who pride themselves on their high reputation for culinary expertise. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine, Charles Fort, the Kinsale Brewing Company and the many interesting speciality shops.


Kinsale - Overview

One of Ireland’s most attractive villages. Visitors are captivated by the town's setting, its long waterfront, narrow streets and slate-clad houses. The bulk of Compass Hill rises sharply over the town, overlooking a natural harbour of great beauty where the Bandon river turns south to the sea. Known as the gourmet captial of Ireland this harbour town has many fine restaurants who pride themselves on their high reputation for culinary expertise. Visits are recommended to the Norman built 12th century church of St.Multose, the 15th century Desmond Castle housing the International Museum of Wine and the many interesting speciality shops.


Ladies View

The most famous and photographed view of Killarney is to be seen at Ladies´ View approximately 11 miles from Killarney town, on the N71 to Kenmare. From here there is a marvellous view of the Killarney Valley. A little further on is another parking area offering spectacular views of the Upper Lake and its islands. Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s highest peak, and the McGillycuddy Reeks (mountains) tower over this most memorable scene.


Lahinch - Overview

Lahinch sits on the Atlantic Ocean and has developed into a friendly holiday centre and golfing mecca. It nestles at the head of Liscannor Bay beside a 2km long beach of golden sands. The old Irish name for Lahinch translates to the “Tomb of O’Connor”, the chieftain of an old local Celtic clan, who according to tradition is buried here. The village is a short drive from the Cliffs of Moher and an ideal location for exploring the Burren Country and taking a drive out to the Loop Head Peninsula. In the holiday season Lahinch is alive with music and dance.


Lahinch #2 image

Visit Bunratty Castle & Folk Park. Illustrating country life in Ireland at the turn of the century, when the old agricultural practices were giving way to the modern era. Your tour should include a visit to the famous "Durty Nellies" reputed to be the oldest pub in Ireland.


Loop Head Peninsula

The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.


Loop Head Peninsula

The scenic roundtrip, which starts from Kilkee, leads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with views on wild scenery, ruined promontory forts and early oratories there are many more sights not to miss, a natural bridge (Bridges of Ross), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' , a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see Connemara in the North and down across the Shannon estuary the Kerry coastline and mountains.


Monks Pub in Ballyvaughan

Renowned for its seafood chowder and friendly atmosphere, Monks Pub is frequented by locals and tourists alike. It is located beside the "old pier" on Ballyvaughan harbour. On a nice sunny day there is nothing like have a drink or a meal sitting outside the pub or even sitting on the harbour wall.


Monks Pub in Ballyvaughan

Renowned for its seafood chowder and friendly atmosphere, Monks Pub is frequented by locals and tourists alike. It is located beside the "old pier" on Ballyvaughan harbour. On a nice sunny day there is nothing like have a drink or a meal sitting outside the pub or even sitting on the harbour wall.


Muckross House and Gardens

Situated close to the shores of Muckross Lake, amidst the beautiul scenery of Killarney National Park. Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was the designer. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843. Today the principal rooms are furnished in period style and portray the elegant lifestyle of the 19th century landowning class. While in the basement, one can imagine the busy bustle of the servants as they went about their daily chores. The Gardens are spectacularly adorned with the red and pink flowers of mature Rhododendrons. Other garden features include a Sunken Garden, a Rock Garden and a Stream Garden. An Arboretum, containing many trees from the Southern Hemisphere, was established here in 1972.


Muckross House and Gardens, Killarney

close to the shores of Muckross Lake, amidst the beautiul scenery of Killarney National Park. Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was the designer. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843. Today the principal rooms are furnished in period style and portray the elegant lifestyle of the 19th century landowning class. While in the basement, one can imagine the busy bustle of the servants as they went about their daily chores. The Gardens are spectacularly adorned with the red and pink flowers of mature Rhododendrons. Other garden features include a Sunken Garden, a Rock Garden and a Stream Garden. An Arboretum, containing many trees from the Southern Hemisphere, was established here in 1972.


Old Midleton Distillery

The visitor is invited to take a one hour tour of the Old Midleton Distillery, the home of Jameson Irish whiskey. The guided tour begins with an audio visual presentation followed by a walk through the beautifully restored industrial complex, unique within Ireland and Britain. See the fully operational Water Wheel, large Grain Stores, Mill Buildings and the largest Pot Still in the world. With the appetite suitably whetted take time to experience the famous tutored Irish Whiskey Tasting in the Jameson Bar.


Old Midleton Distillery

The visitor is invited to take a one hour tour of the Old Midleton Distillery, the home of Jameson Irish whiskey. The guided tour begins with an audio visual presentation followed by a walk through the beautifully restored industrial complex, unique within Ireland and Britain. See the fully operational Water Wheel, large Grain Stores, Mill Buildings and the largest Pot Still in the world. With the appetite suitably whetted take time to experience the famous tutored Irish Whiskey Tasting in the Jameson Bar.


Ring of Kerry

Stretching out into the Atlantic Ocean, the Iveragh Peninsula has a backbone of mighty mountains. Every environment is here, from the snow-capped Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s loftiest peak, through woodland and blanket bog, to the sandy beaches of the coast. The warm waters of the Gulf Stream ensure a mild climate all the year round. Sub-tropical plants grow quite happily here - adding marvellous splashes of colour to the countryside. This is the setting for Ireland´s greatest tour, The Ring of Kerry. The 110-mile (176k) circuit takes in Killorglin, Glenbeigh, Caherciveen, Waterville, Sneem, Kenmare, and Killarney. Killorglin, the home of the legendary Puck Fair, straddles the Laune, an excellent salmon-fishing river. The village of Glenbeigh is hugely popular in summer because of the glorious beach at Rossbeigh and the links course at Dooks. At Caherciveen you can visit the birthplace of the great justice-seeker and parliamentarian Daniel O´Connell (1775-1847). The Liberator, as he was known, eventually settled near the beautiful secluded beaches of Derrynane. In this century, Charlie Chaplin of silent screen fame was a regular visitor to Waterville. Sneem, possibly Ireland´s most colourful village, has won national awards for its beauty and neatness. George Bernard Shaw did much of his playwriting while staying at the nearby Parknasilla Hotel. While much of the coach traffic takes the direct route from Sneem to Moll´s Gap, it is worth going the extra miles to visit the town of Kenmare with its delightful shops and excellent restaurants. If you travel the Ring anti-clockwise, as most traffic tends to do, then spectacular views await you as you head from Moll´s Gap down into the Killarney Valley.


Ring of Kerry

Stretching out into the Atlantic Ocean, the Iveragh Peninsula has a backbone of mighty mountains. Every environment is here, from the snow-capped Corrán Tuathail, Ireland´s loftiest peak, through woodland and blanket bog, to the sandy beaches of the coast. The warm waters of the Gulf Stream ensure a mild climate all the year round. Sub-tropical plants grow quite happily here - adding marvellous splashes of colour to the countryside. This is the setting for Ireland´s greatest tour, The Ring of Kerry. The 110-mile (176k) circuit takes in Killorglin, Glenbeigh, Caherciveen, Waterville, Sneem, Kenmare, and Killarney. Killorglin, the home of the legendary Puck Fair, straddles the Laune, an excellent salmon-fishing river. The village of Glenbeigh is hugely popular in summer because of the glorious beach at Rossbeigh and the links course at Dooks. At Caherciveen you can visit the birthplace of the great justice-seeker and parliamentarian Daniel O´Connell (1775-1847). The Liberator, as he was known, eventually settled near the beautiful secluded beaches of Derrynane. In this century, Charlie Chaplin of silent screen fame was a regular visitor to Waterville. Sneem, possibly Ireland´s most colourful village, has won national awards for its beauty and neatness. George Bernard Shaw did much of his playwriting while staying at the nearby Parknasilla Hotel. While much of the coach traffic takes the direct route from Sneem to Moll´s Gap, it is worth going the extra miles to visit the town of Kenmare with its delightful shops and excellent restaurants. If you travel the Ring anti-clockwise, as most traffic tends to do, then spectacular views await you as you head from Moll´s Gap down into the Killarney Valley.


Shannon #1

Take the opportunity to visit Adare, which is generally regarded as Ireland’s prettiest village. It snuggles in a wooded setting among rich quiet farmlands by the River Maigue. Orange thatched cottages line its broad street, punctuated with beautiful old stone buildings and picturesque ruins.


Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Visit Bunratty Castle & Folk Park. Illustrating country life in Ireland at the turn of the century, when the old agricultural practices were giving way to the modern era. Your tour should include a visit to the famous “Durty Nellies” reputed to be the oldest pub in Ireland.


St Finn Barre’s Cathedral

Situated on a hill and named after the city's patron saint, this early French Gothic cathedral is one of the finest buildings in the city. It stands where the saint established his monastic school about 650 AD. Among its most striking features are the fine rose window, the mosaic pavements and the elaborate carving throughout. The main doorway has a carving depicting the five wise and five foolish virgins meeting the bridegroom


St. Multose

Built in 1190, St. Multose still retains many of its original features. The black letter inscriptions in Norman French, the Easter sepulchre, the baptismal font and the reredos from the Galway Chapel are all features of note. Also worth seeing are the town stocks and a wooden coat of arms. Here Charles II was proclaimed as King by Prince Rupert. St. Multose is one of the oldest Church of Ireland churches in the country.


Stephen Pearce Pottery

located a few hundred yards from the village of Shanagarry and the sleepy fishing village of Ballycotton. Stephen Pearce pottery is all hand made and hand decorated. It continues a 250 year tradition of hand crafted pottery in Co. Cork. In the ancient rural setting of Shanagarry it is easy to appreciate the unique quality of each pot, especially when you see for yourself the person and the hands that created it. Visitors are welcome to watch this ancient craft or to browse through the shop which stocks a selection of Simon Pearce Glass, Jewellery, Linens and of course the entire ranges of Stephen Pearce


The Burren Country

The name Burren is from the Irish – “bhoireann” meaning a stony place. This area to the north west corner of Clare has lain unspoiled since the ice-age and is composed of karstic limestone, the largest area of such in western Europe. It is a place of surprise and delight to botanists, archaeologists and ecologists alike Here grows a wide variety of the most unusual and rarest of plants. This area has some of the finest archaeological megalithic tombs in Ireland, if not in Western Europe. There are relics of human habitation dating back almost 6000 years and in this area alone there are more than 60 wedge tombs, the densest concentration in Ireland. There are also numerous examples of raths earthen ring forts and stone cashels.


The Burren Country

The name Burren is from the Irish – “bhoireann” meaning a stony place. This area to the north west corner of Clare has lain unspoiled since the ice-age and is composed of karstic limestone, the largest area of such in western Europe. It is a place of surprise and delight to botanists, archaeologists and ecologists alike Here grows a wide variety of the most unusual and rarest of plants. This area has some of the finest archaeological megalithic tombs in Ireland, if not in Western Europe. There are relics of human habitation dating back almost 6000 years and in this area alone there are more than 60 wedge tombs, the densest concentration in Ireland. There are also numerous examples of raths earthen ring forts and stone cashels.


The Burren Smokehouse

A family run organisation that was set up in 1989 and since that time they have been producing Ireland’s finest oak smoked Atlantic salmon. The art of cold smoking is historically unique to Ireland. Live demonstrations help the visitor to appreciate the time, skill and care that this truly Irish craft involves. The Smokehouse currently employs a staff of twelve, and ships within Ireland and to countries all over the world.


The Burren Smokehouse

A family run organisation that was set up in 1989 and since that time they have been producing Ireland’s finest oak smoked Atlantic salmon. The art of cold smoking is historically unique to Ireland. Live demonstrations help the visitor to appreciate the time, skill and care that this truly Irish craft involves. The Smokehouse currently employs a staff of twelve, and ships within Ireland and to countries all over the world.


The Dingle Peninsula

is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland. The combination of rugged mountains, craggy cliffs and long sandy beaches brought David Lean here to film 'Ryan's Daughter' in 1970. More recently, the Tom Cruise film 'Far and Away' was made in the Slea Head area. Dingle town is also an important commercial fishing port, built around an enclosed harbour and has many fine restaurants and craft shops.


The Mizen Peninsula & Ballydehob

The Mizen Peninsula is an area of truly rugged beauty. Travelling west along the N71 from Skibbereen to Ballydehob the sea vista is awesome, with the Fastnet Rock Lighthouse to be seen in the distance. Ballydehob's twelve-arch bridge overlooks a water sports lagoon. Here, the N71 takes a right for Bantry, but you can continue straight on through the village to complete the Mizen tour. (Full Day touring).


The Mizen Peninsula & Ballydehob

The Mizen Peninsula is an area of truly rugged beauty. Travelling west along the N71 from Skibbereen to Ballydehob the sea vista is awesome, with the Fastnet Rock Lighthouse to be seen in the distance. Ballydehob's twelve-arch bridge overlooks a water sports lagoon. Here, the N71 takes a right for Bantry, but you can continue straight on through the village to complete the Mizen tour. (Full Day touring).


Tralee

Take the opportunity to explore the remote Dingle peninsula. The Peninsula is widely regarded as having some of the most dramatic scenery in Ireland. Within its small compass it has many interesting antiquities, historic sites, a large number of ancient stone monuments and varied mountain scenery than any other part of Ireland.


Tralee - Overview

Tralee is the administrative capital of County Kerry. Famed for its Rose of Tralee Festival held every year at the end of August. Tralee is a lovely town with wide streets surrounded by narrow streets giving a pleasant village feeling. It central location makes for an ideal base for touring the scenic beauty of Kerry


< Donegal #1

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Tour the area surrounding Donegal town. Visit Killybegs, a major port in the Irish fishing industry and very lively when the catches are landed. Continue to Kilcar, a centre for Donegal Tweed, where visitors can watch the weaving and buy the cloth. The Cliffs of Bunglass are one of the most spectacular views in Ireland where the southern face of Slieve League drops sheer into the sea.

< Ballyliffin #1

Enjoy a walking tour of the historical city of Londonderry. The Derry walls are one of the finest examples in Europe, built during the period 1613-1618 as defences for early seventeenth century settlers from England and Scotland. They have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days and encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile.

< Ballyliffin #2

Tour the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal, 26 miles in length and breadth at its greatest points. It is the most northerly part of Ireland, Lough Swilly forms its westerly boundary and Lough Foyle it’s eastern. Monuments of an earlier age grow from the landscape as castle towers and ancient churches. The Celtic crosses and the pagan monuments come together in a colourful tapestry with these great houses of the last century, to leave lasting memories for the visitor of this undiscovered part of Ireland.

< Benbulben Pottery

Started by Dave McLoughlin in 1996 in Rathcormac. Since then many other units have been added to form Rathcormac Craft Village. The pottery produces a wide range of functional pottery and one off ceramic pieces. Visitors are welcome to see the pottery being made on the potters wheel as well as seeing the finished product in our showroom.

< Boat Trip to Inishmurray Island

The remote and mystical Inishmurray Island four miles from the coast of Sligo is uniquely preserved as an early Christian site and as a wildlife sanctuary. Here amidst a wild panorama of mountain and sea St Molaise founded a Christian monastery in the 6th century. It remains remarkably intact to this day. The monks, and the islanders, are gone now but Inishmurray still captures the imagination. Here we can still see Molaise's monastic settlement with it's several curious artefacts - many of which may well have their origins in pre-Christian times. Vestiges of pagan and Christian beliefs abide in harmony. Inishmurray is an island shrouded in romance and mystery, a repository of culture and customs lost and gone forever on the more accessible mainland.

< Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery

The largest and one of the most important megalithic sites in Europe. Over 60 tombs have been located by archaeologists, the oldest pre-dates Newgrange by 700 years and is older than the pyramids. A restored cottage houses a small exhibition relating to the site.

< Donegal - Overview

Donegal Town whose name in Irish means "Fort of the Foreigners" is situated at the point where the river Eske flows into Donegal Bay. Today, this bustling small town is still very popular with tourists and is an ideal base from which to explore the south and west of the County. The attractive centrepiece of the market is known as the Diamond, it is here that you will find a tall obelisk dedicated to the memory of the Four Masters. This was the name given to the four fiars, led by Michael O'Cleary, who in the 17th century complied the Annals of the Four Masters, one of the earliest historical texts recording the early history of Ireland. The town is a main centre for the tweed industry in Ireland and is home to John Magee, world-renowned manufacturers of Donegal Tweed.

< Donegal #2

Enjoy a visit to Donegal, a thriving market town at the head of Donegal Bay, established as a Viking stronghold. The best way to see Donegal town is to follow the Tourist Trail, a sign-posted walking tour that begins in the Diamond, a square designed in the 1600s. The tourist trail is clearly signposted and includes such attractions as Donegal Castle, various churches and a Napoleonic anchor retrieved from the sea in the 1850's.

< Donegal Castle

Built by the O Donell chieftains in the 15th century on the River Eske at the centre of Donegal Town. Rebuilt in Jacobean style in 16th century by Sir Basil Brooke after Hugh O Donell burnt it to the ground rather than let the castle fall to enemy hands. Information panels chronicle the history of the castle and guided tours are available. The castle opens each season from mid March to the end of October.

< Donegal Craft Village

Established in 1985 and has become a showcase for contemporary arts and crafts in the county. It consists of a cluster of small units grounded around a common courtyard. Professional craft workers who work here all year round lease individual workshops of various sizes. The crafts include metalwork, batik, jewellery, sculpture, a stone carver and a glass blowing workshop. There is also a picnic area and a coffee shop specialising in fresh baking in the beautiful landscaped craft village grounds.

< Glenveagh Castle & National Park

a 19th century castellated mansion and was built between 1867 and 1873. Its construction in a remote mountain setting was inspired by the Victorian idyll of a romantic highland retreat. John Townsend Trench, a cousin of its builder and first owner, John George Adair, with whom he had been raised in County Laois, designed it. Although not a professional architect, Trench had a hand in at least one other building: he designed the Gothic town hall in Arklow, built in 1878. Some 16,500 hectares of mountains, lakes, glens and woods with a large heard of red deer. The central feature is a 19th century castle surrounded by the famous Glenveagh Gardens. The visitor centre is accessible for visitors with disabilities.

< Killybegs

situated on County Donegal's South West Coast about 18 miles from Donegal Town. The picturesque approach to the town is dominated by many gentle slopes rolling down to the beautiful Donegal Bay. It is Ireland's premier fishing port and the majority of it's 3000 population are employed in the fishing industry. During the fishing season cargo ships flying flags from all over the world are a common sight in the modern harbour. For decades Killybegs was famous for it's famous hand-tufted carpets, examples of which can be seen in The Vatican and The White House, to mention but a few. For the traveller Killybegs could be described as the gateway to the villages of Kilcar, Carrick, Teelin and Glencolmcille and some of Ireland's most rugged and beautiful scenery and well known Gaeltacht region.

< Lissadell House

Chiefly remembered as the childhood home of Constance Markievicz, one of those condemned to death for their part in the 1916 Easter Rising, and of her sister, the poet and suffragette Eva Gore-Booth, and for their friendship with the young W.B. Yeats, immortalised in the poem he wrote in their memory after both sisters had died. " The light of evening, Lissadell, Great windows open to the South...."

< Magee of Donegal

Founded in Donegal Town in 1866, the original Magee store has developed from a small draper’s to a reputable clothing store. Always one of Donegal’s most important attractions and famous for its hand-woven tweeds, Magee has also kept abreast of fashionable trends with the launch of a new Casual Collection in addition to other leading brands. Our Giftware department specialises in authentic Irish gifts including Irish Linens, Waterford Crystal, Newbridge, Nicholas Mosse and Bellek Living.

< Slieve League Cliffs

On the R263, an 8km detour at the village of Carrick will bring you to the eastern end of Slieve League Mountain, whose sea cliffs are the highest in Europe (756ft). At McGinley’s Pub in the village of Carrick turn left and follow the road signposted Bunglas and Slieve League. This bumpy drive will take you to Irish-speaking village of Teelin. Just before the school in Teelin turn right for Bunglas and follow the rising road, which leads to a car park. By the car park is a farm gate through which you can drive – ensuring that you close the gate behind you. The panorama is truly spectacular as you traverse the mile and a half to the next car park at the cliff top. However, the drive is not for the faint-hearted.

< Sligo

Visit Sligo, a lively and attractive town with splendid shop fronts. It is also a significant cultural centre and has a fine range of art galleries and museums. Over 1,000 years of history have shaped the town, but it is literature that attracts many of its visitors. This is Yeats Country, and the subject of one of his best known poems is just outside the town – the Isle of Inisfree in Lough Gill. Sligo has many other attractions including its two fine cathedrals and Sligo Abbey; a Dominican Friary founded in 1252.

< Sligo - Overview

Sligo is a busy market town on the short River Garavogue which drains Lough Gill into the sea. It is surrounded by beautiful and varied scenery, green and wooded valleys and lofty mountains. The beauty of the landscape is reflected in the poetry of W.B Yeats and in the paintings of his brother Jack.B.Yeats. W.B Yeats is recognised as one of the greatest poets of the English language, a prominence which was acknowledged by his confirmation as Nobel Prize winner for literature in 1923. His continuing impact on literature can be evidenced from his influence on subsequent poets which has guaranteed Yeats an honoured place in the canon of English literature. You will enjoy touring the many sites connected to Yeats in the Sligo area. Be sure to walk through Sligo Town, with its many bars and restaurants and historic buildings from when Sligo was a bustling trading port.

< Sligo Abbey

Known locally as the "Abbey" this abbey survives from the medieval days. It was built by Maurice Fitzgerald for the Dominicans in 1252 and was accidentally burnt down in 1414, when a candle left carelessly in the building set it on fire, and it was further damaged during the 1641 rebellion. Legend says that worshippers saved the Abbey's silver bell which was thrown into Lough Gill and only those free from sin can hear it peal. The site contains a great wealth of carvings including Gothic and Renaissance tomb sculpture, well preserved cloisters and the only sculptured 15th century high altar to survive in any Irish monastic church.

< Triona Design

A family run business situated in Ardara-Home of Donegal Tweed in a building, which is built in 1908 and has housed generations of weavers. They still today manufacture all the fabric where you have the opportunity to learn and observe the art of hand weaving. The shop then consists of all the handmade produce of the finest quality also manufactured on the premises. The coffee shop caters a wide range of refreshments and our tourist information displays an important selection of all interests and services in the local area.

< Yeats Grave

Although he died on France, he was eventually buried at Drumcliff Church. Tidly maintained, the plain grave of the poet lies within the shadow of the flat topped Benbulben Mountain. The headstone bears an inscription from his final poem.

< Yeats Memorial Building

Located between the top of O Connell St and Hyde Bridge this is one of the most picturesque buildings in Sligo. Built in 1898 by the Belfast Banking Co. the building was donated to the Yeats Society of Sligo in 1973 and is now home to a photographic and audiovisual centre on WB Yeats. There is also a library of Anglo-Irish writings. Sligo Art Gallery is located on the first floor, where it plays host to visiting exhibitions.
Donegal #1 image

Tour the area surrounding Donegal town. Visit Killybegs, a major port in the Irish fishing industry and very lively when the catches are landed. Continue to Kilcar, a centre for Donegal Tweed, where visitors can watch the weaving and buy the cloth. The Cliffs of Bunglass are one of the most spectacular views in Ireland where the southern face of Slieve League drops sheer into the sea.


Ballyliffin #1

Enjoy a walking tour of the historical city of Londonderry. The Derry walls are one of the finest examples in Europe, built during the period 1613-1618 as defences for early seventeenth century settlers from England and Scotland. They have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days and encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile.


Ballyliffin #2

Tour the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal, 26 miles in length and breadth at its greatest points. It is the most northerly part of Ireland, Lough Swilly forms its westerly boundary and Lough Foyle it’s eastern. Monuments of an earlier age grow from the landscape as castle towers and ancient churches. The Celtic crosses and the pagan monuments come together in a colourful tapestry with these great houses of the last century, to leave lasting memories for the visitor of this undiscovered part of Ireland.


Benbulben Pottery

Started by Dave McLoughlin in 1996 in Rathcormac. Since then many other units have been added to form Rathcormac Craft Village. The pottery produces a wide range of functional pottery and one off ceramic pieces. Visitors are welcome to see the pottery being made on the potters wheel as well as seeing the finished product in our showroom.


Boat Trip to Inishmurray Island

The remote and mystical Inishmurray Island four miles from the coast of Sligo is uniquely preserved as an early Christian site and as a wildlife sanctuary. Here amidst a wild panorama of mountain and sea St Molaise founded a Christian monastery in the 6th century. It remains remarkably intact to this day. The monks, and the islanders, are gone now but Inishmurray still captures the imagination. Here we can still see Molaise's monastic settlement with it's several curious artefacts - many of which may well have their origins in pre-Christian times. Vestiges of pagan and Christian beliefs abide in harmony. Inishmurray is an island shrouded in romance and mystery, a repository of culture and customs lost and gone forever on the more accessible mainland.


Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery

The largest and one of the most important megalithic sites in Europe. Over 60 tombs have been located by archaeologists, the oldest pre-dates Newgrange by 700 years and is older than the pyramids. A restored cottage houses a small exhibition relating to the site.


Donegal - Overview

Donegal Town whose name in Irish means "Fort of the Foreigners" is situated at the point where the river Eske flows into Donegal Bay. Today, this bustling small town is still very popular with tourists and is an ideal base from which to explore the south and west of the County. The attractive centrepiece of the market is known as the Diamond, it is here that you will find a tall obelisk dedicated to the memory of the Four Masters. This was the name given to the four fiars, led by Michael O'Cleary, who in the 17th century complied the Annals of the Four Masters, one of the earliest historical texts recording the early history of Ireland. The town is a main centre for the tweed industry in Ireland and is home to John Magee, world-renowned manufacturers of Donegal Tweed.


Donegal #2

Enjoy a visit to Donegal, a thriving market town at the head of Donegal Bay, established as a Viking stronghold. The best way to see Donegal town is to follow the Tourist Trail, a sign-posted walking tour that begins in the Diamond, a square designed in the 1600s. The tourist trail is clearly signposted and includes such attractions as Donegal Castle, various churches and a Napoleonic anchor retrieved from the sea in the 1850's.


Donegal Castle

Built by the O Donell chieftains in the 15th century on the River Eske at the centre of Donegal Town. Rebuilt in Jacobean style in 16th century by Sir Basil Brooke after Hugh O Donell burnt it to the ground rather than let the castle fall to enemy hands. Information panels chronicle the history of the castle and guided tours are available. The castle opens each season from mid March to the end of October.


Donegal Craft Village

Established in 1985 and has become a showcase for contemporary arts and crafts in the county. It consists of a cluster of small units grounded around a common courtyard. Professional craft workers who work here all year round lease individual workshops of various sizes. The crafts include metalwork, batik, jewellery, sculpture, a stone carver and a glass blowing workshop. There is also a picnic area and a coffee shop specialising in fresh baking in the beautiful landscaped craft village grounds.


Glenveagh Castle & National Park

a 19th century castellated mansion and was built between 1867 and 1873. Its construction in a remote mountain setting was inspired by the Victorian idyll of a romantic highland retreat. John Townsend Trench, a cousin of its builder and first owner, John George Adair, with whom he had been raised in County Laois, designed it. Although not a professional architect, Trench had a hand in at least one other building: he designed the Gothic town hall in Arklow, built in 1878. Some 16,500 hectares of mountains, lakes, glens and woods with a large heard of red deer. The central feature is a 19th century castle surrounded by the famous Glenveagh Gardens. The visitor centre is accessible for visitors with disabilities.


Killybegs

situated on County Donegal's South West Coast about 18 miles from Donegal Town. The picturesque approach to the town is dominated by many gentle slopes rolling down to the beautiful Donegal Bay. It is Ireland's premier fishing port and the majority of it's 3000 population are employed in the fishing industry. During the fishing season cargo ships flying flags from all over the world are a common sight in the modern harbour. For decades Killybegs was famous for it's famous hand-tufted carpets, examples of which can be seen in The Vatican and The White House, to mention but a few. For the traveller Killybegs could be described as the gateway to the villages of Kilcar, Carrick, Teelin and Glencolmcille and some of Ireland's most rugged and beautiful scenery and well known Gaeltacht region.


Lissadell House

Chiefly remembered as the childhood home of Constance Markievicz, one of those condemned to death for their part in the 1916 Easter Rising, and of her sister, the poet and suffragette Eva Gore-Booth, and for their friendship with the young W.B. Yeats, immortalised in the poem he wrote in their memory after both sisters had died. " The light of evening, Lissadell, Great windows open to the South...."


Magee of Donegal

Founded in Donegal Town in 1866, the original Magee store has developed from a small draper’s to a reputable clothing store. Always one of Donegal’s most important attractions and famous for its hand-woven tweeds, Magee has also kept abreast of fashionable trends with the launch of a new Casual Collection in addition to other leading brands. Our Giftware department specialises in authentic Irish gifts including Irish Linens, Waterford Crystal, Newbridge, Nicholas Mosse and Bellek Living.


Slieve League Cliffs

On the R263, an 8km detour at the village of Carrick will bring you to the eastern end of Slieve League Mountain, whose sea cliffs are the highest in Europe (756ft). At McGinley’s Pub in the village of Carrick turn left and follow the road signposted Bunglas and Slieve League. This bumpy drive will take you to Irish-speaking village of Teelin. Just before the school in Teelin turn right for Bunglas and follow the rising road, which leads to a car park. By the car park is a farm gate through which you can drive – ensuring that you close the gate behind you. The panorama is truly spectacular as you traverse the mile and a half to the next car park at the cliff top. However, the drive is not for the faint-hearted.


Sligo

Visit Sligo, a lively and attractive town with splendid shop fronts. It is also a significant cultural centre and has a fine range of art galleries and museums. Over 1,000 years of history have shaped the town, but it is literature that attracts many of its visitors. This is Yeats Country, and the subject of one of his best known poems is just outside the town – the Isle of Inisfree in Lough Gill. Sligo has many other attractions including its two fine cathedrals and Sligo Abbey; a Dominican Friary founded in 1252.


Sligo - Overview

Sligo is a busy market town on the short River Garavogue which drains Lough Gill into the sea. It is surrounded by beautiful and varied scenery, green and wooded valleys and lofty mountains. The beauty of the landscape is reflected in the poetry of W.B Yeats and in the paintings of his brother Jack.B.Yeats. W.B Yeats is recognised as one of the greatest poets of the English language, a prominence which was acknowledged by his confirmation as Nobel Prize winner for literature in 1923. His continuing impact on literature can be evidenced from his influence on subsequent poets which has guaranteed Yeats an honoured place in the canon of English literature. You will enjoy touring the many sites connected to Yeats in the Sligo area. Be sure to walk through Sligo Town, with its many bars and restaurants and historic buildings from when Sligo was a bustling trading port.


Sligo Abbey

Known locally as the "Abbey" this abbey survives from the medieval days. It was built by Maurice Fitzgerald for the Dominicans in 1252 and was accidentally burnt down in 1414, when a candle left carelessly in the building set it on fire, and it was further damaged during the 1641 rebellion. Legend says that worshippers saved the Abbey's silver bell which was thrown into Lough Gill and only those free from sin can hear it peal. The site contains a great wealth of carvings including Gothic and Renaissance tomb sculpture, well preserved cloisters and the only sculptured 15th century high altar to survive in any Irish monastic church.


Triona Design

A family run business situated in Ardara-Home of Donegal Tweed in a building, which is built in 1908 and has housed generations of weavers. They still today manufacture all the fabric where you have the opportunity to learn and observe the art of hand weaving. The shop then consists of all the handmade produce of the finest quality also manufactured on the premises. The coffee shop caters a wide range of refreshments and our tourist information displays an important selection of all interests and services in the local area.


Yeats Grave

Although he died on France, he was eventually buried at Drumcliff Church. Tidly maintained, the plain grave of the poet lies within the shadow of the flat topped Benbulben Mountain. The headstone bears an inscription from his final poem.


Yeats Memorial Building

Located between the top of O Connell St and Hyde Bridge this is one of the most picturesque buildings in Sligo. Built in 1898 by the Belfast Banking Co. the building was donated to the Yeats Society of Sligo in 1973 and is now home to a photographic and audiovisual centre on WB Yeats. There is also a library of Anglo-Irish writings. Sligo Art Gallery is located on the first floor, where it plays host to visiting exhibitions.


< St. Patrick’s Cathedral

image
Saint Patrick's Cathedral has contributed much to Irish life throughout its long history (it was founded in 1191). The writer and satirist Jonathan Swift was Dean of Saint Patrick's from 1713-1747. Handel's Messiah received its first performance in 1742 sung by the combined choir of Saint Patrick's and Christchurch. Music has played an integral part in the life of Saint Patrick's since its foundation and it is the only cathedral in Ireland to sing two services everyday. Living Stones, the cathedral's permanent exhibition, celebrates Saint Patrick's place in the life of the city, its history and its role at the dawn of the third millennium. It emphasises that the cathedral is not a museum but a building embracing the past to herald the future.

< Dublin - Overview

Ireland’s capital, has fast become one of Europe’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities. The city has always had a reputation as a great historical city, and its strong links with world literature and the arts are readily apparent. It certainly has a lot to offer visitors - not least it's diverse attractions. There is a wealth of architectural detail with the medieval core of the city surrounded by elegant Georgian squares. A great way to see Dublin is on foot and be sure to take a break from your sightseeing by stopping into one of Dublin's many pubs and bars, or after a long, busy day get yourself a quiet pint, and enjoy the craic.

< Dublin #1

Visit Ireland’s capital, which has fast become one of Europe’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities. Amongst the many attractions are St.Patrick’s Cathedral and Trinity College to view the Book of Kells in the College Library. There is a wealth of architectural detail with the medieval core of the city surrounded by elegant Georgian squares.

< Dublin #2

Enjoy a visit to the Howth peninsula, affording wonderful views of the city, and an ideal place to stop for a seafood lunch in one of the harbourside cafes. Continue to Malahide, a pretty village where narrow streets slope down to the sea. Make sure to visit Malahide Castle that dates back from to the 12th century.

< Dublin Writers Museum

Dublin is famous as a city of writers and literature, and the Dublin Writers Museum is an essential visit for anyone who wants to discover, explore, or simply enjoy Dublins immense literary heritage. At the Writers Musuem, Dublin’s literary celebrities from the past three hundred years are brought to life through their books, letters, portraits and personal items.The building, a restored Georgian mansion on Parnell Square, is a treasure in itself. The sumptuous plasterwork in the first floor Gallery of Writers is worth a visit alone. You may also be interested in the Dublin Literary Pub Crawl. The tour is a two hour entertainment featuring professional actors who perform extracts from the works of Ireland's best known writers. The pubs included on the tour are: O'Neill's, The Long Hall, Davy Byrnes. Actors perform from the works of James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde, Brendan Behan, Mary Lavin, with biographical information about many more.

< Guinness Storehouse

A fermentation plant at St. James’s Gate Brewery has been transformed into a place where you can experience one of the world’s best known brands in a totally unexpected way. It’s the Home, Heart & Soul of Guinness. At the Guinness Storehouse you'll discover all there is to know about the world famous beer. It's a dramatic story that begins over 250 years ago and ends in Gravity, the sky bar, with a complimentary pint of Guinness and an astonishing view of Dublin City.

< James Joyce Centre

From a beautifully restored 18th century townhouse location the Centre's aim, to foster, promote and encourage awareness of the international literary significance of James Joyce and to develop an understanding of his work, is exhibited through our permanent collection (the door to number 7 Eccles Street, Leon Room furniture and library of Joyce works, translations and criticism) Guided walking tours that explore the north inner city, Joyce's creative heartland, may be booked through the Centre.

< Number 29

Situated in the heart of Dublin's fashionable Georgian streets, this is a unique museum. A restored four-story town house that reflects the lifestyle of a Dublin middle-class family during the period 1790 to 1820. The exhibition ranges from artefacts and works of art of the time, to carpets, curtains, floor coverings, decorations, paintwork, plasterwork, and bellpulls The nursery also includes dolls and toys of the era.

< Shopping

The best shopping is to be found on Grafton Street, located between Trinity College and St Stephen's Green. A pedestrianised street with fashionable stores such as Brown Thomas, the department store catering for many designer showcases, both foreign and local. Dublin's leading and most exclusive jewellers, Weirs, is also here, as well as the most popular of the famous Bewley's Cafés. Other principal shopping streets in the area include Wicklow Street, Dawson Street, and South Great Georges Street.

< Trinity College and the Book of Kells

Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth. Among many famous students to attend the college were playwrights Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Beckett. Trinity's lawns and cobbled quads provide a pleasant haven in the heart of the city. The major attraction is the Book of Kells, housed in the Old Library. The Book of Kells was written around the year 800 AD and is one of the most beautifully illuminated manuscripts in the world. The Book of Kells Turning Darkness into Light explains the background of the story of the famous gospel manuscript.

< Waterford

Visit the town of Waterford where a visit to the Waterford Crystal Factory and the Visitor Centre is a must. Home to the world's largest display of Waterford crystal, beautifully displayed in a bright, airy retail store. See how they work generations of design experience into pieces that are as individual as the people who make them. It’s a real working environment but you can get very close up to the process and see the work almost through the eyes of the artisans.
St. Patrick’s Cathedral image

Saint Patrick's Cathedral has contributed much to Irish life throughout its long history (it was founded in 1191). The writer and satirist Jonathan Swift was Dean of Saint Patrick's from 1713-1747. Handel's Messiah received its first performance in 1742 sung by the combined choir of Saint Patrick's and Christchurch. Music has played an integral part in the life of Saint Patrick's since its foundation and it is the only cathedral in Ireland to sing two services everyday. Living Stones, the cathedral's permanent exhibition, celebrates Saint Patrick's place in the life of the city, its history and its role at the dawn of the third millennium. It emphasises that the cathedral is not a museum but a building embracing the past to herald the future.


Dublin - Overview

Ireland’s capital, has fast become one of Europe’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities. The city has always had a reputation as a great historical city, and its strong links with world literature and the arts are readily apparent. It certainly has a lot to offer visitors - not least it's diverse attractions. There is a wealth of architectural detail with the medieval core of the city surrounded by elegant Georgian squares. A great way to see Dublin is on foot and be sure to take a break from your sightseeing by stopping into one of Dublin's many pubs and bars, or after a long, busy day get yourself a quiet pint, and enjoy the craic.


Dublin #1

Visit Ireland’s capital, which has fast become one of Europe’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities. Amongst the many attractions are St.Patrick’s Cathedral and Trinity College to view the Book of Kells in the College Library. There is a wealth of architectural detail with the medieval core of the city surrounded by elegant Georgian squares.


Dublin #2

Enjoy a visit to the Howth peninsula, affording wonderful views of the city, and an ideal place to stop for a seafood lunch in one of the harbourside cafes. Continue to Malahide, a pretty village where narrow streets slope down to the sea. Make sure to visit Malahide Castle that dates back from to the 12th century.


Dublin Writers Museum

Dublin is famous as a city of writers and literature, and the Dublin Writers Museum is an essential visit for anyone who wants to discover, explore, or simply enjoy Dublins immense literary heritage. At the Writers Musuem, Dublin’s literary celebrities from the past three hundred years are brought to life through their books, letters, portraits and personal items.The building, a restored Georgian mansion on Parnell Square, is a treasure in itself. The sumptuous plasterwork in the first floor Gallery of Writers is worth a visit alone. You may also be interested in the Dublin Literary Pub Crawl. The tour is a two hour entertainment featuring professional actors who perform extracts from the works of Ireland's best known writers. The pubs included on the tour are: O'Neill's, The Long Hall, Davy Byrnes. Actors perform from the works of James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde, Brendan Behan, Mary Lavin, with biographical information about many more.


Guinness Storehouse

A fermentation plant at St. James’s Gate Brewery has been transformed into a place where you can experience one of the world’s best known brands in a totally unexpected way. It’s the Home, Heart & Soul of Guinness. At the Guinness Storehouse you'll discover all there is to know about the world famous beer. It's a dramatic story that begins over 250 years ago and ends in Gravity, the sky bar, with a complimentary pint of Guinness and an astonishing view of Dublin City.


James Joyce Centre

From a beautifully restored 18th century townhouse location the Centre's aim, to foster, promote and encourage awareness of the international literary significance of James Joyce and to develop an understanding of his work, is exhibited through our permanent collection (the door to number 7 Eccles Street, Leon Room furniture and library of Joyce works, translations and criticism) Guided walking tours that explore the north inner city, Joyce's creative heartland, may be booked through the Centre.


Number 29

Situated in the heart of Dublin's fashionable Georgian streets, this is a unique museum. A restored four-story town house that reflects the lifestyle of a Dublin middle-class family during the period 1790 to 1820. The exhibition ranges from artefacts and works of art of the time, to carpets, curtains, floor coverings, decorations, paintwork, plasterwork, and bellpulls The nursery also includes dolls and toys of the era.


Shopping

The best shopping is to be found on Grafton Street, located between Trinity College and St Stephen's Green. A pedestrianised street with fashionable stores such as Brown Thomas, the department store catering for many designer showcases, both foreign and local. Dublin's leading and most exclusive jewellers, Weirs, is also here, as well as the most popular of the famous Bewley's Cafés. Other principal shopping streets in the area include Wicklow Street, Dawson Street, and South Great Georges Street.


Trinity College and the Book of Kells

Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth. Among many famous students to attend the college were playwrights Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Beckett. Trinity's lawns and cobbled quads provide a pleasant haven in the heart of the city. The major attraction is the Book of Kells, housed in the Old Library. The Book of Kells was written around the year 800 AD and is one of the most beautifully illuminated manuscripts in the world. The Book of Kells Turning Darkness into Light explains the background of the story of the famous gospel manuscript.


Waterford

Visit the town of Waterford where a visit to the Waterford Crystal Factory and the Visitor Centre is a must. Home to the world's largest display of Waterford crystal, beautifully displayed in a bright, airy retail store. See how they work generations of design experience into pieces that are as individual as the people who make them. It’s a real working environment but you can get very close up to the process and see the work almost through the eyes of the artisans.


< The Giants Causeway

image
According to legend, the symmetrical columns reaching out to sea were the work of the giant, Finn MacCool. Today geologists try to convince us that thousands of polygonal columns were formed 55 million years ago, when a lava flow cooled and solidified, and that the oldest rocks of the Causeway started posing for visitors about 600 million years ago. The facts and the fiction of this “World Heritage Site” are vividly presented in the Causeway Centre, where there is an audio-visual theatre, tea room and gift shop.

< Ardglass

with its magnificent harbour is one of the three major fishing ports in Northern Ireland. Water based sports and Sea Angling are popular. Ardglass has benefited from the new Ardglass Marina 842332 Complex opened in 1996, with berthing facilities for 83 vessels, perfect for exploring the South Down coast and on the rushing waters of Strangford Lough.

< Ballintoy Harbour

Ballintoy's hidden beauty is found at the end of the harbour road where you will find a small beach and a limestone harbour. In recent years the harbour has been upgraded and is very popular with fishermen and deep sea divers alike. The beautiful limestone and basalt cliffs, the caves and headlands in the harbour area are a spectacular site. You will be encouraged to arrange a fishing trip in one of the local boats or you can simply watch the artists painting.

< Belfast

Take a city tour of Belfast, where you will visit the many sights and learn of the city’s fascinating history. A predominately Victorian city, which owes its expansion to the textile, engineering and shipbuilding industries. It’s here that Harland and Wolff built Titanic the ill-fated liner in 1912.

< Bushmills & The Antrim Coast - Overview

Bushmills village has a unique north Antrim quality - a walk along the Main Street will reveal the odd shop or bar that can only be described as 'living heritage', unchanged and totally 'unique' they continue to ply their trade as they have always done to the local rural farming community for generations. In recent times the village has taken on a revitalized appearance. Designation as a conservation area keeps developments within the aesthetics of the 'conservation theme' and preserve the 'unique' character of Bushmills for generations to come. It location is ideal for touring the Antrim Coast.

< Bushmills Distillery

King James I granted the original licence to distil “Aqua Vitae” at Bushmills in April 1608 and so the village has been making the finest Irish malt whiskey for almost 400 years. The distillery is situated just two miles from the Giant's Causeway and close to the Bushmills Inn. “Old Bushmills” runs a guided tour for you to see everything first hand and of course no visit is complete without enjoying a glass of the final product. The Bushmills Inn naturally features the full range of Bushmills whiskey including its own unique 25 year-old private cask pure malt.

< Carrick a Rede Rope Bridge

There has been a rope bridge here for over 200 years, but in earlier times it had just a single hand rail. It was first erected to reach an important fishery. Salmon entering the bay below Carrick-a-Rede will not swim through the narrows below the bridge, but are deflected by the island into the fish nets. Crossing this narrow bouncy bridge of planks and ropes, precariously poised 80 feet above the sea, is not for the fainthearted. It is erected each Spring and is normally taken down in mid-September.

< Castle Ward

A 750 acre walled estate is in a stunning location overlooking Strangford Lough. The mid-Georgian mansion is an architectural curiosity of its time, built inside and out in two distinct styles, Classical and Gothic. The Victorian laundry, playroom, cornmill, leadmine and sawmill give the full flavour of how the estate worked. The grounds encompass woodland and lough-side paths and horse trails, formal gardens, Old Castle Ward, Temple Water and the Strangford Lough Wildlife Centre.

< Down Cathedral

a Cathedral of the Church of Ireland. It was built in 1183 as a Benedictine Monastry. In the graveyard we have the reputed grave of St. Patrick. Magnificent stain glass windows, box pews and beautiful organ case enhances this interesting building. Souvenir shop and toilet facilities.

< Dunluce Castle

The dramatic ruin of Dunluce Castle forms the remains of the largest, most sophisticated castle on the Northern Irish coastline. Perched on an 100 foot-high sheer cliff, the only way to enter is across a long narrow bridge overlooked by the battlements. The castle dates from the 10th century, and the history of the castle is a story of the legendary “Sorley Boy” of the wild MacDonnells from Scotland, and their terrible feuds with the O’ Neills of Ulster and the forces of the English crown.

< Kilkeel

Situated in the heart of the Kingdom of the Mournes. It is renowned for its thriving fishing industry, which can be experienced through a visit down to the Harbour. It is home to one of the largest and best equipped fishing fleets in Ireland, fresh fish is available all year round. The Nautilus Centre provides visitors with the opportunity to see how nets and boats are mended and they can also sample some of the local catch, which is mainly king prawns.

< Mount Stewart House & Gardens

The famous gardens at Mount Stewart were planted in the 1920s and have been nominated a World Heritage Site. The magnificent series of outdoor ‘rooms’ and vibrant parterres contain many rare plants that thrive in the mild climate of the Ards. There are dramatic views over Strangford Lough from the Temple of the Winds. The house tour includes world-famous paintings and stories about the prominent political figures to whom the Londonderry family played host.

< Newcastle - Overview

Nestling at the foot of the world famous Slieve Donard, Mountains of Mourne, Newcastle's natural attractions draw visitors by the thousands. With a population of 7,214 Newcastle is Down's second largest populated town. Five mile stretch of golden sands is still the essence of the resort and is hugely popular for swimming, sunbathing and other forms of recreation.

< Newcastle #1

Visit Downpatrick an important historical town, which until recently was almost entirely surrounded by water. It is here that you should visit the Saint Patrick Centre, which tells the story of Ireland’s patron Saint before visiting the traditional site of St.Patrick’s Grave in the nearby grounds of Down Cathedral.

< Newcastle #2

Enjoy a visit to Mount Stewart, Northern Ireland’s most celebrated garden. This great diversity of style and plants from every continent were ingeniously combined by Edith, Lady Londonderry to produce a garden of outstanding quality and character.

< Portrush #1

Enjoy the delights of the Antrim Coastline. Outside of Portrush lies Dunluce Castle. The jagged silhouette of the ruins of Dunluce Castle rises from the cliff edge above the sea. Continue to the lunar landscape of the Giant’s Causeway. Legend has it that the causeway is the work of the giant Finn McCool, the Ulster warrior and commander of the king of Ireland’s armies. The causeway proper is the most spectacular series of geological features to be found along the North Antrim Coast consisting of 40,000 columns rising from the sea.

< Portrush #2

Enjoy a visit to Bushmills Distillery, the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world, established in 1608. Following your guided tour take a walk out to the Carrick-a-rede-Rope Bridge. During the walk, along the Larrybane Cliffs, sea birds wheel and scream over the waves below. The Rope Bridge bounces and sways as one ventures gingerly along the planks above the rock-strewn water 60ft below.

< Rowallane Gardens

A natural landscape, 21 hectares of which is planted with an outstanding collection of trees, shrubs and other plants from many parts of the world, creating a colourful display of form and colour throughout the year. Established in the 1860's by the Rev. John Moore, and carried on by his plant-collecting nephew in the early 1900's. Planting and collecting continue today. Facilities: Tea room, Disabled carpark and toilets. Guided tours: Last Saturday each month, available by appointment.

< St Patricks Centre

Telling the story of Ireland's patron saint through a dynamic and informative exhibition using multimedia technology. Housed in an amazing new building which gives close access to St Patrick's Grave

< The City of Derry

You can enjoy a walking tour of the historical city of Londonderry. The Derry walls are one of the finest examples in Europe, built during the period 1613-1618 as defences for early seventeenth century settlers from England and Scotland. They have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days and encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile.

< The Glens of Antrim

Continue on the Antrim Coastal Road over bridges and under arches, past bays and beaches into the Glens of Antrim. Wild in their beauty, each glen deserves a visit, but above all else don’t miss Glenariff, the queen of the glens with its gushing waterfalls and scenic path skirting the sheer sides of the plunging gorge.

< The Grianan of Aileach

One of the finest stone forts in Ireland. From the hill-top there are commanding views over Lough Foyle, Lough Swilly, and Londonderry. In the walls are small chambers, a series of stairs at regular intervals inside the walls gave access to the wallwalk. Legend says it was built by the ancient gods; the ring fort was known as the Sun Palace and was held sacred.

< The Inishowen Peninsula

Tour the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal. 26 miles in length and breadth at its greatest point. It is the most northerly part of Ireland, Lough Swilly forms its westerly boundary and Lough Foyle its eastern. Monuments of an earlier age grow from the landscape as castle towers and ancient churches. The Celtic crosses and the pagan monuments come together in a colourful tapestry with these great houses of the last century, to leave lasting memories for the visitor of this undiscovered part of Ireland

< Tollymore Forest Park

Home to Northern Ireland's first forest park. The forest park was given to the Department of Agriculture by the Roden Family in 1957, and its stunning views of the Mournes play host to thousands of visitors to the Park annually. There are many splendid walks through the beautiful forest to attractions including Hermitage, the Salmon Leap and the Drinns. The arboretum contains a wide variety of mature confers, broadleaves and colourful shrubs including Cork Oak from Portugal and a Strawberry Tree, the only tree special native to Ireland and not Great Britain.
The Giants Causeway image

According to legend, the symmetrical columns reaching out to sea were the work of the giant, Finn MacCool. Today geologists try to convince us that thousands of polygonal columns were formed 55 million years ago, when a lava flow cooled and solidified, and that the oldest rocks of the Causeway started posing for visitors about 600 million years ago. The facts and the fiction of this “World Heritage Site” are vividly presented in the Causeway Centre, where there is an audio-visual theatre, tea room and gift shop.


Ardglass

with its magnificent harbour is one of the three major fishing ports in Northern Ireland. Water based sports and Sea Angling are popular. Ardglass has benefited from the new Ardglass Marina 842332 Complex opened in 1996, with berthing facilities for 83 vessels, perfect for exploring the South Down coast and on the rushing waters of Strangford Lough.


Ballintoy Harbour

Ballintoy's hidden beauty is found at the end of the harbour road where you will find a small beach and a limestone harbour. In recent years the harbour has been upgraded and is very popular with fishermen and deep sea divers alike. The beautiful limestone and basalt cliffs, the caves and headlands in the harbour area are a spectacular site. You will be encouraged to arrange a fishing trip in one of the local boats or you can simply watch the artists painting.


Belfast

Take a city tour of Belfast, where you will visit the many sights and learn of the city’s fascinating history. A predominately Victorian city, which owes its expansion to the textile, engineering and shipbuilding industries. It’s here that Harland and Wolff built Titanic the ill-fated liner in 1912.


Bushmills & The Antrim Coast - Overview

Bushmills village has a unique north Antrim quality - a walk along the Main Street will reveal the odd shop or bar that can only be described as 'living heritage', unchanged and totally 'unique' they continue to ply their trade as they have always done to the local rural farming community for generations. In recent times the village has taken on a revitalized appearance. Designation as a conservation area keeps developments within the aesthetics of the 'conservation theme' and preserve the 'unique' character of Bushmills for generations to come. It location is ideal for touring the Antrim Coast.


Bushmills Distillery

King James I granted the original licence to distil “Aqua Vitae” at Bushmills in April 1608 and so the village has been making the finest Irish malt whiskey for almost 400 years. The distillery is situated just two miles from the Giant's Causeway and close to the Bushmills Inn. “Old Bushmills” runs a guided tour for you to see everything first hand and of course no visit is complete without enjoying a glass of the final product. The Bushmills Inn naturally features the full range of Bushmills whiskey including its own unique 25 year-old private cask pure malt.


Carrick a Rede Rope Bridge

There has been a rope bridge here for over 200 years, but in earlier times it had just a single hand rail. It was first erected to reach an important fishery. Salmon entering the bay below Carrick-a-Rede will not swim through the narrows below the bridge, but are deflected by the island into the fish nets. Crossing this narrow bouncy bridge of planks and ropes, precariously poised 80 feet above the sea, is not for the fainthearted. It is erected each Spring and is normally taken down in mid-September.


Castle Ward

A 750 acre walled estate is in a stunning location overlooking Strangford Lough. The mid-Georgian mansion is an architectural curiosity of its time, built inside and out in two distinct styles, Classical and Gothic. The Victorian laundry, playroom, cornmill, leadmine and sawmill give the full flavour of how the estate worked. The grounds encompass woodland and lough-side paths and horse trails, formal gardens, Old Castle Ward, Temple Water and the Strangford Lough Wildlife Centre.


Down Cathedral

a Cathedral of the Church of Ireland. It was built in 1183 as a Benedictine Monastry. In the graveyard we have the reputed grave of St. Patrick. Magnificent stain glass windows, box pews and beautiful organ case enhances this interesting building. Souvenir shop and toilet facilities.


Dunluce Castle

The dramatic ruin of Dunluce Castle forms the remains of the largest, most sophisticated castle on the Northern Irish coastline. Perched on an 100 foot-high sheer cliff, the only way to enter is across a long narrow bridge overlooked by the battlements. The castle dates from the 10th century, and the history of the castle is a story of the legendary “Sorley Boy” of the wild MacDonnells from Scotland, and their terrible feuds with the O’ Neills of Ulster and the forces of the English crown.


Kilkeel

Situated in the heart of the Kingdom of the Mournes. It is renowned for its thriving fishing industry, which can be experienced through a visit down to the Harbour. It is home to one of the largest and best equipped fishing fleets in Ireland, fresh fish is available all year round. The Nautilus Centre provides visitors with the opportunity to see how nets and boats are mended and they can also sample some of the local catch, which is mainly king prawns.


Mount Stewart House & Gardens

The famous gardens at Mount Stewart were planted in the 1920s and have been nominated a World Heritage Site. The magnificent series of outdoor ‘rooms’ and vibrant parterres contain many rare plants that thrive in the mild climate of the Ards. There are dramatic views over Strangford Lough from the Temple of the Winds. The house tour includes world-famous paintings and stories about the prominent political figures to whom the Londonderry family played host.


Newcastle - Overview

Nestling at the foot of the world famous Slieve Donard, Mountains of Mourne, Newcastle's natural attractions draw visitors by the thousands. With a population of 7,214 Newcastle is Down's second largest populated town. Five mile stretch of golden sands is still the essence of the resort and is hugely popular for swimming, sunbathing and other forms of recreation.


Newcastle #1

Visit Downpatrick an important historical town, which until recently was almost entirely surrounded by water. It is here that you should visit the Saint Patrick Centre, which tells the story of Ireland’s patron Saint before visiting the traditional site of St.Patrick’s Grave in the nearby grounds of Down Cathedral.


Newcastle #2

Enjoy a visit to Mount Stewart, Northern Ireland’s most celebrated garden. This great diversity of style and plants from every continent were ingeniously combined by Edith, Lady Londonderry to produce a garden of outstanding quality and character.


Portrush #1

Enjoy the delights of the Antrim Coastline. Outside of Portrush lies Dunluce Castle. The jagged silhouette of the ruins of Dunluce Castle rises from the cliff edge above the sea. Continue to the lunar landscape of the Giant’s Causeway. Legend has it that the causeway is the work of the giant Finn McCool, the Ulster warrior and commander of the king of Ireland’s armies. The causeway proper is the most spectacular series of geological features to be found along the North Antrim Coast consisting of 40,000 columns rising from the sea.


Portrush #2

Enjoy a visit to Bushmills Distillery, the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world, established in 1608. Following your guided tour take a walk out to the Carrick-a-rede-Rope Bridge. During the walk, along the Larrybane Cliffs, sea birds wheel and scream over the waves below. The Rope Bridge bounces and sways as one ventures gingerly along the planks above the rock-strewn water 60ft below.


Rowallane Gardens

A natural landscape, 21 hectares of which is planted with an outstanding collection of trees, shrubs and other plants from many parts of the world, creating a colourful display of form and colour throughout the year. Established in the 1860's by the Rev. John Moore, and carried on by his plant-collecting nephew in the early 1900's. Planting and collecting continue today. Facilities: Tea room, Disabled carpark and toilets. Guided tours: Last Saturday each month, available by appointment.


St Patricks Centre

Telling the story of Ireland's patron saint through a dynamic and informative exhibition using multimedia technology. Housed in an amazing new building which gives close access to St Patrick's Grave


The City of Derry

You can enjoy a walking tour of the historical city of Londonderry. The Derry walls are one of the finest examples in Europe, built during the period 1613-1618 as defences for early seventeenth century settlers from England and Scotland. They have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days and encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile.


The Glens of Antrim

Continue on the Antrim Coastal Road over bridges and under arches, past bays and beaches into the Glens of Antrim. Wild in their beauty, each glen deserves a visit, but above all else don’t miss Glenariff, the queen of the glens with its gushing waterfalls and scenic path skirting the sheer sides of the plunging gorge.


The Grianan of Aileach

One of the finest stone forts in Ireland. From the hill-top there are commanding views over Lough Foyle, Lough Swilly, and Londonderry. In the walls are small chambers, a series of stairs at regular intervals inside the walls gave access to the wallwalk. Legend says it was built by the ancient gods; the ring fort was known as the Sun Palace and was held sacred.


The Inishowen Peninsula

Tour the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal. 26 miles in length and breadth at its greatest point. It is the most northerly part of Ireland, Lough Swilly forms its westerly boundary and Lough Foyle its eastern. Monuments of an earlier age grow from the landscape as castle towers and ancient churches. The Celtic crosses and the pagan monuments come together in a colourful tapestry with these great houses of the last century, to leave lasting memories for the visitor of this undiscovered part of Ireland


Tollymore Forest Park

Home to Northern Ireland's first forest park. The forest park was given to the Department of Agriculture by the Roden Family in 1957, and its stunning views of the Mournes play host to thousands of visitors to the Park annually. There are many splendid walks through the beautiful forest to attractions including Hermitage, the Salmon Leap and the Drinns. The arboretum contains a wide variety of mature confers, broadleaves and colourful shrubs including Cork Oak from Portugal and a Strawberry Tree, the only tree special native to Ireland and not Great Britain.




Our Gracious Clients

  • The trip was absolutely fantastic.  It blew away all of my expectations and Perry's service was impeccable.  Our driver) was great showing us the sights as well as taking care of our golf arrangements.  Can't wait to plan my next trip!
    Mr. James P.
    Scotland
  • Thanks again for the greatest golf voyage a true golfer and student of the game could ever experience! It was the trip of a lifetime.
    Mr. Gerry G.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • We had a wonderful time on the PerryGolf Southeast Asia trip. Colin Dalgleish accompanied us and was the perfect host! We would recommend PerryGolf and the Asia trip to golfers and non-golfers alike. You will be amazed at the spa inclusive Fusion Maia Resort in Da Nang. It was our favorite spot.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jeff W.
    Southeast Asia Escorted
  • Our expectations were thoroughly exceeded! Special thanks to our [PerryGolf VIP Concierge] driver and host, John. Incredible service, sense of humor and a total gentleman. Many thanks for a trip of a lifetime!
    Mr. Brian T.
    Scotland
  • We are over the Atlantic now headed home from a fabulous couple of weeks in Italy. I want you to know that the trip will always be one of my all-time favorites! Every aspect was first class. The guides were among the best ever. The hotels were fabulous. The food was over the top. We are going home to rest!
    Mr. and Mrs. Ron H.
    Italy Escorted
  • We had an outstanding trip to Ireland. PerryGolf was spot on with accommodations and recommendations for our entire group of 7 (4 golfers and 3 non golfers). The only question now is “when do we go to Scotland?
    Mr. Michael M.
    Ireland
  • Just wanted to let you know we had an outstanding trip. Alastair Niven did an outstanding job of working with us and the Scottish Highlander barge was truly wonderful - the crew, the food, the logistics. The golf was super fun and even the weather was perfect. Couldn't have asked for a better trip. Thx!
    Mrs. David W.
    Scottish Highlander Hotel Barge Golf Cruise
  • We had a great trip.  I would not do it any other way. Our [PerryGolf VIP Concierge] driver, John, was absolutely the best thing about our trip.  He made it so easy, He became part of our group and a friend.  What more could you ask?
    Mr. Doug S.
    Scotland
  • Gordon Turner was an excellent – PerryGolf is fortunate to have such a good representative in Cape Town. I found the extra day we stayed at Eagle’s Crag, a learning occasion of a lifetime.
    Mr. Russel W.
    South Africa
  • This was a wonderful trip. New Zealand is a welcoming place and golf there is everything I had hoped. Thanks for steering us to this tour.
    Mr. C. Van A.
    New Zealand
  • PerryGolf did an exceptional job!  Courses were great. Hotels were very nice, but the best part was our driver, Joe Marshall.  He was outstanding.  Within two minutes of our arrival he knew everyone's name and stayed on top of any details. 
    Mr. Chris J.
    Scotland
  • Our impression of the total PerryGolf experience is very positive. Very organized. Very timely. Very friendly. Special kudos goes to John Henderson who will leave lasting impressions with his spirit, and his friendliness. Please pass on our congratulations!!
    Bob and Ruth C.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • Our Ireland excursion with Perry couldn’t have been better! Patrick, our driver/guide, was superb and is obviously a veteran at hosting travel groups. We’ll certainly use Perry for our next international golf trip, and don’t hesitate to use me for a reference.
    Mr. Robert L.
    Ireland
  • Excellent trip. Patrick, our host / driver, was fantastic....a good sport, an excellent restaurant advisor, and a top notch tee time negotiator. Will definitely utilize the services of PerryGolf again!
    Mr. John K.
    Scotland
  • Our trip was a bit unusual in that we had to reschedule at the last minute but Keith Baird made it happen for the following year. John Finnigan was our driver and he was also excellent. We had a wonderful time and would use Perry Golf again for sure.
    Mrs. Susan F.
    Scotland
  • On our recent trip to Asia we experienced the “Trifecta of great travel”..... world-class golf, exotic excursions and luxurious accommodations. To capture the city excitement of Saigon, the Zen beaches of Da Nang and the exotic jungle of Siem Reap all in one trip was awesome!
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam S.
    Southeast Asia Escorted
  • We drove into Southampton and saw the PerryGolf truck in the terminal. Angus met us and from that moment forward the guys took great care of us. They are terrific. The organization of the trip was absolutely top notch at every level. It was as if an experienced local put together their “dream trip” and took us along with him!
    George and Jana D.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • We had great days but the one at the Old Course was icing on the cake.. What can you say about the Old Course, unless you have experienced it for yourself no words can do it justice. Thanks again for making our trip run so smooth and seamless.
    Mr. Jim S.
    Scotland
  • Our trip was exceptional. We had great weather, stayed in excellent accommodations and played some outstanding golf courses. I don't know of anything that could have turned out better than it did! Thanks again Colin and give our best to Anne.
    Mr. Gary T.
    New Zealand Escorted
  • This is the second time I have travelled with PerryGolf. The thing I like the most is that there are no surprises. Everything works flawlessly. When you show up they are ready for you and everything works seamlessly. That is what I am looking for when I travel for golf. Thanks.
    Mr. Josh S.
    Scotland
  • We had an excellent trip to Scotland. Everything planned to perfection and well thought out. We were celebrating my dad's 75th birthday who had the trips only eagle and it was on the Old Course! Thanks to Joe, our guide, and the entire PerryGolf team. Cheers.
    Mr. Thomas B.
    Scotland
  • It's difficult to find the right words to describe how Sharon and I feel about PerryGolf now that we’ve had the opportunity to experience one of your trips. Outstanding! Exceptional! Superb! First Class! Thought of every possible need! Surpassed expectations by 1000%!!!
    Dave and Sharon C.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • Thank you so much for giving us the best vacation we could have wished for. We loved the golf, our driver Steve, Doonbeg Resort, the scenery, the Irish people, even the food, and of course the pubs. You are the very best. Your experience and competence showed throughout the trip.
    Ms. Marcia M.
    Ireland
  • The variety of things to do made the trip better than I could imagine. Gordon Turner is delightful and obviously flexible to have dealt with the changes and details of our trip. This is the third Perry Golf trip I have been on and have had excellent experiences with all of them.
    Ms. Clair S.
    South Africa
  • My family and I have used PerryGolf on numerous occasions. Up to now, we have always booked trips of the "self-drive" variety. This year, I arranged a group of eight and we took one of your VIP coaches. What a difference. The ease of doing business with your company is why we keep coming back, trip after trip.
    Mrs. Sue R.
    England and Scotland
  • Everything exceeded expectation. It was all wonderful and if there were any ‘behind the scenes’ challenges I was not aware of them which is a good thing. Would I recommend PerryGolf to my friends/colleagues – yes in a heartbeat!
    Dr. and Mrs. Gerald K.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • Once again, thanks for helping me complete a golf trip that was at the top of my bucket list. My only lament is that the trip is now in the rear view mirror.
    Mr. Harold R.
    Ireland
  • Our trip was fantastic- the itinerary, the courses, the directions, our reception at the airport, Alastair's help before we left- all were excellent.Thanks for making a memorable vacation a possibility; I am sure this will go down as my Dad's favorite birthday present!
    Mr. Jacob H.
    Scotland
  • This was my second trip with PerryGolf, and as it has been in the past, a fantastic trip. I can't say enough about your company and your entire staff. In the real estate business, I know my best business model is referrals, so you can bet I will refer all of my golfing friends to PerryGolf.
    Mr. Chuck S.
    Ireland
  • Once again, you have far exceeded very high expectations which you do on each trip. I continue to recommend PerryGolf to all who want to travel to Scotland. We look forward to our next trip.
    Mr. Dennis T.
    Scotland
  • Everyone at PerryGolf were top notch – took care of all the details, kept us informed and were fun. We will recommend PerryGolf to clients and friends and hope to travel again with PerryGolf on another great adventure.
    Mrs. Janice M.
    Open Championship Golf Cruise
  • Our driver, Michael Anderson, was absolutely terrific. I have taken guides on other trips to Europe and it always makes the trips when you don’t have to worry about details upon your arrival such as tee times, directions, reservations, etc. Mike was among the best I’ve ever had.
    Mr. Charles S.
    Scotland
  • Thank you so much for a fabulous golf tour of Asia. From the outset, our golf, hotel and transfers were smooth and efficient. Your support teams in Bangkok, Cambodia and Vietnam are outstanding. A special thanks to your guides who added fascinating local snippets of history or humor!
    Mrs. Natalie P.
    Southeast Asia Escorted
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